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      Dynamic and heterogeneous effects of sibling death on children’s outcomes

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      Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
      Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

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          Abstract

          This paper explores the effects of experiencing the death of a sibling on children's developmental outcomes. Recent work has shown that experiencing a sibling death is common and long-term effects are large. We extend understanding of these effects by estimating dynamic effects on surviving siblings' cognitive and socioemotional outcomes, as well as emotional and cognitive support by parents. Using the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (CNLSY79), we find large initial effects on cognitive and noncognitive outcomes that decline over time. We also provide evidence that the effects are larger if the surviving child is older and less prominent if the deceased child was either disabled or an infant, suggesting sensitive periods of exposure. Auxiliary results show that parental investments in the emotional support of surviving children decline following the death of their child.

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          Most cited references14

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          On the Interaction between the Quantity and Quality of Children

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            Long-term effects of the death of a child on parents' adjustment in midlife.

            The death of a child is a traumatic event that can have long-term effects on the lives of parents. This study examined bereaved parents of deceased children (infancy to age 34) and comparison parents with similar backgrounds (n = 428 per group) identified in the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. An average of 18.05 years following the death, when parents were age 53, bereaved parents reported more depressive symptoms, poorer well-being, and more health problems and were more likely to have experienced a depressive episode and marital disruption than were comparison parents. Recovery from grief was associated with having a sense of life purpose and having additional children but was unrelated to the cause of death or the amount of time since the death. The results point to the need for detection and intervention to help those parents who are experiencing lasting grief. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.
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              Long-Term Effects of Child Death on Parents' Health-Related Quality of Life: A Dyadic Analysis

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                Proc Natl Acad Sci USA
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                0027-8424
                1091-6490
                January 02 2018
                January 02 2018
                January 02 2018
                December 18 2017
                : 115
                : 1
                : 115-120
                Article
                10.1073/pnas.1709092115
                5776792
                29255028
                103684a0-fd1f-4693-804d-d0083dadf6bc
                © 2017

                Free to read

                http://www.pnas.org/site/misc/userlicense.xhtml

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