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      Test of Colonisation Scenarios Reveals Complex Invasion History of the Red Tomato Spider Mite Tetranychus evansi

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          Abstract

          The spider mite Tetranychus evansi is an emerging pest of solanaceous crops worldwide. Like many other emerging pests, its small size, confusing taxonomy, complex history of associations with humans, and propensity to start new populations from small inocula, make the study of its invasion biology difficult. Here, we use recent developments in Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) and variation in multi-locus genetic markers to reconstruct the complex historical demography of this cryptic invasive pest. By distinguishing among multiple pathways and timing of introductions, we find evidence for the “bridgehead effect”, in which one invasion serves as source for subsequent invasions. Tetranychus evansi populations in Europe and Africa resulted from at least three independent introductions from South America and involved mites from two distinct sources in Brazil, corresponding to highly divergent mitochondrial DNA lineages. Mites from southwest Brazil (BR-SW) colonized the African continent, and from there Europe through two pathways in a “bridgehead” type pattern. One pathway resulted in a widespread invasion, not only to Europe, but also to other regions in Africa, southern Europe and eastern Asia. The second pathway involved the mixture with a second introduction from BR-SW leading to an admixed population in southern Spain. Admixture was also detected between invasive populations in Portugal. A third introduction from the Brazilian Atlantic region resulted in only a limited invasion in Europe. This study illustrates that ABC methods can provide insights into, and distinguish among, complex invasion scenarios. These processes are critical not only in understanding the biology of invasions, but also in refining management strategies for invasive species. For example, while reported observations of the mite and outbreaks in the invaded areas were largely consistent with estimates of geographical expansion from the ABC approach, historical observations failed to recognize the complex pathways involved and the corresponding effects on genetic diversity.

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          Most cited references 114

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          Detecting the number of clusters of individuals using the software STRUCTURE: a simulation study.

          The identification of genetically homogeneous groups of individuals is a long standing issue in population genetics. A recent Bayesian algorithm implemented in the software STRUCTURE allows the identification of such groups. However, the ability of this algorithm to detect the true number of clusters (K) in a sample of individuals when patterns of dispersal among populations are not homogeneous has not been tested. The goal of this study is to carry out such tests, using various dispersal scenarios from data generated with an individual-based model. We found that in most cases the estimated 'log probability of data' does not provide a correct estimation of the number of clusters, K. However, using an ad hoc statistic DeltaK based on the rate of change in the log probability of data between successive K values, we found that STRUCTURE accurately detects the uppermost hierarchical level of structure for the scenarios we tested. As might be expected, the results are sensitive to the type of genetic marker used (AFLP vs. microsatellite), the number of loci scored, the number of populations sampled, and the number of individuals typed in each sample.
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            Inference of population structure using multilocus genotype data.

            We describe a model-based clustering method for using multilocus genotype data to infer population structure and assign individuals to populations. We assume a model in which there are K populations (where K may be unknown), each of which is characterized by a set of allele frequencies at each locus. Individuals in the sample are assigned (probabilistically) to populations, or jointly to two or more populations if their genotypes indicate that they are admixed. Our model does not assume a particular mutation process, and it can be applied to most of the commonly used genetic markers, provided that they are not closely linked. Applications of our method include demonstrating the presence of population structure, assigning individuals to populations, studying hybrid zones, and identifying migrants and admixed individuals. We show that the method can produce highly accurate assignments using modest numbers of loci-e.g. , seven microsatellite loci in an example using genotype data from an endangered bird species. The software used for this article is available from http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/ approximately pritch/home. html.
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              A simple method for estimating evolutionary rates of base substitutions through comparative studies of nucleotide sequences.

               Motoo Kimura (1980)
              Some simple formulae were obtained which enable us to estimate evolutionary distances in terms of the number of nucleotide substitutions (and, also, the evolutionary rates when the divergence times are known). In comparing a pair of nucleotide sequences, we distinguish two types of differences; if homologous sites are occupied by different nucleotide bases but both are purines or both pyrimidines, the difference is called type I (or "transition" type), while, if one of the two is a purine and the other is a pyrimidine, the difference is called type II (or "transversion" type). Letting P and Q be respectively the fractions of nucleotide sites showing type I and type II differences between two sequences compared, then the evolutionary distance per site is K = -(1/2) ln [(1-2P-Q) square root of 1-2Q]. The evolutionary rate per year is then given by k = K/(2T), where T is the time since the divergence of the two sequences. If only the third codon positions are compared, the synonymous component of the evolutionary base substitutions per site is estimated by K'S = -(1/2) ln (1-2P-Q). Also, formulae for standard errors were obtained. Some examples were worked out using reported globin sequences to show that synonymous substitutions occur at much higher rates than amino acid-altering substitutions in evolution.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS ONE
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, USA )
                1932-6203
                2012
                23 April 2012
                : 7
                : 4
                Affiliations
                [1 ]INRA, UMR CBGP (INRA/IRD/Cirad/Montpellier SupAgro), CS 30016, Montferrier-sur-Lez, France
                [2 ]Environmental Science Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley, California, United States of America
                [3 ]Faculdade de Ciências, Centro de Biologia Ambiental, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal
                Ghent University, Belgium
                Author notes

                Conceived and designed the experiments: AB AM. Performed the experiments: AB. Analyzed the data: AB AM JMC MN. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: GKR JMC AM SM. Wrote the paper: AB AM MN. Made comments on earlier versions of the Manuscript: PA. Improved the writing of the manuscript: GKR. Sampling, made suggestions on the manuscript: SM.

                PONE-D-11-12174
                10.1371/journal.pone.0035601
                3335100
                22539983
                Boubou et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
                Counts
                Pages: 13
                Categories
                Research Article
                Biology
                Ecology
                Population Ecology
                Evolutionary Biology
                Evolutionary Systematics
                Phylogenetics
                Population Genetics
                Genetics
                Population Genetics
                Plant Science
                Plant Pathology
                Plant Pests
                Population Biology
                Population Genetics
                Genetic Polymorphism
                Haplotypes
                Population Ecology
                Mathematics
                Probability Theory
                Bayes Theorem

                Uncategorized

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