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      HLA-G2, -G3, and -G4 Isoforms Expressed as Nonmature Cell Surface Glycoproteins Inhibit NK and Antigen-Specific CTL Cytolysis

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          HLA-E binds to natural killer cell receptors CD94/NKG2A, B and C.

          The protein HLA-E is a non-classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule of limited sequence variability. Its expression on the cell surface is regulated by the binding of peptides derived from the signal sequence of some other MHC class I molecules. Here we report the identification of ligands for HLA-E. We constructed tetramers in which recombinant HLA-E and beta2-microglobulin were refolded with an MHC leader-sequence peptide, biotinylated, and conjugated to phycoerythrin-labelled Extravidin. This HLA-E tetramer bound to natural killer (NK) cells and a small subset of T cells from peripheral blood. On transfectants, the tetramer bound to the CD94/NKG2A, CD94/NKGK2B and CD94/NKG2C NK cell receptors, but did not bind to the immunoglobulin family of NK cell receptors (KIR). Surface expression of HLA-E was enough to protect target cells from lysis by CD94/NKG2A+ NK-cell clones. A subset of HLA class I alleles has been shown to inhibit killing by CD94/NKG2A+ NK-cell clones. Only the HLA alleles that possess a leader peptide capable of upregulating HLA-E surface expression confer resistance to NK-cell-mediated lysis, implying that their action is mediated by HLA-E, the predominant ligand for the NK cell inhibitory receptor CD94/NKG2A.
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            A Common Inhibitory Receptor for Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules on Human Lymphoid and Myelomonocytic Cells

            Natural killer (NK) cell–mediated lysis is negatively regulated by killer cell inhibitory receptors specific for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. In this study, we characterize a novel inhibitory MHC class I receptor of the immunoglobulin-superfamily, expressed not only by subsets of NK and T cells, but also by B cells, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. This receptor, called Ig-like transcript (ILT)2, binds MHC class I molecules and delivers a negative signal that inhibits killing by NK and T cells, as well as Ca2+ mobilization in B cells and myelomonocytic cells triggered through the B cell antigen receptor and human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA)–DR, respectively. In addition, myelomonocytic cells express receptors homologous to ILT2, which are characterized by extensive polymorphism and might recognize distinct HLA class I molecules. These results suggest that diverse leukocyte lineages have adopted recognition of self–MHC class I molecules as a common strategy to control cellular activation during an immune response.
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              HLA-E is a major ligand for the natural killer inhibitory receptor CD94/NKG2A

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                The Journal of Immunology
                J Immunol
                The American Association of Immunologists
                0022-1767
                1550-6606
                April 15 2001
                April 15 2001
                April 15 2001
                April 15 2001
                : 166
                : 8
                : 5018-5026
                Article
                10.4049/jimmunol.166.8.5018
                118713fa-d39d-4e64-a25a-75dbfeaa70fd
                © 2001
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