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Precision cardio-oncology: understanding the cardiotoxicity of cancer therapy

, 1 , 2 , 3

NPJ Precision Oncology

Nature Publishing Group UK

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      Abstract

      Current oncologic treatments have brought a strong reduction in mortality in cancer patients. However, the cancer therapy-related cardiovascular complications, in particular chemo-therapy and radiation therapy-induced cardiotoxicities are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in people living with or surviving cancer. The simple fact is that all antineoplastic agents and radiation therapy target tumor cells but also result in collateral damage to other tissues including the cardiovascular system. The commonly used anthracycline chemotherapy agents can induce cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. Targeted therapies with human epidermal growth factor antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors or vascular endothelial growth factor antibodies, and the antimetabolites also have shown to induce cardiomyopathy and myocardial ischemia. Cardiac arrhythmias and hypertension have been well described with the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and antimicrotubule agents. Pericarditis can happen with the use of cyclophosphamide or cytarabine. Mediastinal radiation can cause constrictive pericarditis, myocardial fibrosis, valvular lesions, and coronary artery disease. Despite significant progresses in the understanding of the molecular and pathophysiologic mechanisms behind the cardiovascular toxicity of cancer therapy, there is still lack of evidence-based approach for the monitoring and management of patients. This review will focus mainly on the recent advances in the molecular mechanisms of cardiotoxicity related to common cancer therapies while introducing the concept of cardio-oncology service. Applying the general principles of multi-disciplinary approaches toward the diagnosis, prevention, monitoring, and treatment of cancer therapy-induced cardiomyopathy and heart failure will also be discussed.

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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2287 3919, GRID grid.257413.6, Reid Health, , Indiana University School of Medicine, ; Richmond, IN 47374 USA
            [2 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2189 3846, GRID grid.207374.5, Professor of Medicine and Director, Cancer Center of Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, , Zhengzhou University, ; Zhengzhou, Henan China
            [3 ]ISNI 0000 0000 9277 8602, GRID grid.412098.6, Professor of Biochemistry and Director, Zhengzhou Central Laboratory of Antibody Research, , Henan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, ; Zhengzhou, Henan China
            Contributors
            +765-962-1337 , Xinqhan@iupui.edu
            Journal
            NPJ Precis Oncol
            NPJ Precis Oncol
            NPJ Precision Oncology
            Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
            2397-768X
            12 September 2017
            12 September 2017
            2017
            : 1
            : 1
            5871905
            34
            10.1038/s41698-017-0034-x
            © The Author(s) 2017

            Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

            Categories
            Review Article
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            © The Author(s) 2017

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