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      Effects of controllability and desire for control on coping and stress responses

      1 , 2 , 2

      The Japanese Journal of Health Psychology

      Japan Society of Health Psychology

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          Most cited references 6

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          Coping, stress, and social resources among adults with unipolar depression.

          We used a stress and coping paradigm to guide the development of indices of coping responses and to explore the roles of stress, social resources, and coping among 424 men and women entering treatment for depression. We also used an expanded concept of multiple domains of life stress to develop several indices of ongoing life strains. Although most prior studies have focused on acute life events, we found that chronic strains were somewhat more strongly and consistently related to the severity of dysfunction. The coping indices generally showed acceptable conceptual and psychometric characteristics and only moderate relationships to respondents' sociodemographic characteristics or to the severity of the stressful event for which coping was sampled. Coping responses directed toward problem solving and affective regulation were associated with less severe dysfunction, whereas emotional-discharge responses, more frequently used by women, were linked to greater dysfunction. Stressors, social resources, and coping were additively predictive of patient's functioning, but coping and social resources did not have stress-attenuation or buffering effects.
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            Life event stress, social support, coping style, and risk of psychological impairment.

            The effects of life event stress, coping style, and social support on psychological impairment were examined in a survey of a representative Australian suburban sample (N = 863). Psychological impairment was defined as a score of 4 or more on the 20-item General Health Questionnaire. Life event stress, coping style, and one of the social support variates, crisis support, were related to impairment, significantly decreasing or increasing the risk of being identified as impaired from the total sample frequency of 24 per cent. There was no evidence that coping style or social support became associated by moderating the relationship between life event stress and impairment, but rather because of their independent relationship with psychological impairment.
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              Appraisal coping health status and psychological symptoms

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                The Japanese Journal of Health Psychology
                Japan Society of Health Psychology
                0917-3323
                2187-5529
                2002
                2002
                : 15
                : 1
                : 32-40
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Graduate School of Biosphere Sciences, Hiroshima University
                [2 ]Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University
                Article
                10.11560/jahp.15.1_32
                © 2002

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