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Data exploration of social client relationship management (CRM 2.0) adoption in the Nigerian construction business

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      Abstract

      Integrating social client relationship management (CRM 2.0) in the built environment can enhance the relationship between construction organizations and client towards sustaining a long and lasting collaboration. The data exploration analyzed the e-readiness of contracting and consulting construction firms in the uptake of CRM 2.0 and the barriers encountered in the adoption of the modern business tool. The targeted organizations consist of seventy five (75) construction businesses operating in Lagos State which were selected from a pool of registered contracting and consulting construction firms using random sampling technique. Descriptive statistics of the e-readiness of contracting and consulting construction firms for CRM 2.0 adoption and barriers limiting its uptake were analyzed. Also, inferential analysis using Mann–Whitney U statistical and independent sample t-test was performed on the dataset obtained. The data generated will support construction firms on the necessity to engage in client social relationship management in ensuring sustainable client relationship management in the built environment.

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      Building partnerships: case studies of client–contractor collaboration in the UK construction industry

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        Random number datasets generated from statistical analysis of randomly sampled GSM recharge cards

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          Survey datasets on the externalizing behaviors of primary school pupils and secondary school students in some selected schools in Ogun State, Nigeria

          This data article contains the partial analysis (descriptive statistics) of data obtained from 1770 primary school pupils and secondary school students in three Local Government Areas of Ogun State, Nigeria. The schools are either privately owned or public (government owned) schools. The aim of the field survey is to measure the level and patterns of externalizing behavior of the respondents. The data was collected using a standardized questionnaire. The questionnaire is a modification of Achenbach manual for Child behavior checklist (Achenbach, 2001) [1] and manual for Youth self-report (Achenbach and Rescorla, 2001) [2]. The questionnaire was designed to suit the demographic and socio-cultural nature of the target population. Analysis of the data can provide useful insights to the patterns of externalizing behavior of primary school pupils and secondary school students.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [a ]Department of Building Technology, Covenant University, Nigeria
            [b ]Department of Quantity Surveying, Bells University of Technology, Nigeria
            [c ]Department of Architecture, Covenant University, Nigeria
            Author notes
            Contributors
            Journal
            Data Brief
            Data Brief
            Data in Brief
            Elsevier
            2352-3409
            17 April 2018
            June 2018
            17 April 2018
            : 18
            : 1471-1476
            5997962
            S2352-3409(18)30388-3
            10.1016/j.dib.2018.04.037
            © 2018 The Authors

            This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

            Categories
            Nursing and Health Professions

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