Blog
About

1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Role of renal vascular potassium channels in physiology and pathophysiology

      1 , 2 , 3

      Acta Physiologica

      Wiley

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 165

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Physiological roles and properties of potassium channels in arterial smooth muscle.

          This review examines the properties and roles of the four types of K+ channels that have been identified in the cell membrane of arterial smooth muscle cells. 1) Voltage-dependent K+ (KV) channels increase their activity with membrane depolarization and are important regulators of smooth muscle membrane potential in response to depolarizing stimuli. 2) Ca(2+)-activated K+ (KCa) channels respond to changes in intracellular Ca2+ to regulate membrane potential and play an important role in the control of myogenic tone in small arteries. 3) Inward rectifier K+ (KIR) channels regulate membrane potential in smooth muscle cells from several types of resistance arteries and may be responsible for external K(+)-induced dilations. 4) ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels respond to changes in cellular metabolism and are targets of a variety of vasodilating stimuli. The main conclusions of this review are: 1) regulation of arterial smooth muscle membrane potential through activation or inhibition of K+ channel activity provides an important mechanism to dilate or constrict arteries; 2) KV, KCa, KIR, and KATP channels serve unique functions in the regulation of arterial smooth muscle membrane potential; and 3) K+ channels integrate a variety of vasoactive signals to dilate or constrict arteries through regulation of the membrane potential in arterial smooth muscle.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Guide to Receptors and Channels (GRAC), 5th edition.

            The Fifth Edition of the 'Guide to Receptors and Channels' is a compilation of the major pharmacological targets divided into seven sections: G protein-coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion channels, ion channels, catalytic receptors, nuclear receptors, transporters and enzymes. These are presented with nomenclature guidance and summary information on the best available pharmacological tools, alongside suggestions for further reading. Available alongside this publication is a portal at http://www.GuideToPharmacology.org which is produced in close association with NC-IUPHAR and allows free online access to the information presented in the Fifth Edition. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Ion channels and their functional role in vascular endothelium.

               B Nilius,  G Droogmans (2001)
              Endothelial cells (EC) form a unique signal-transducing surface in the vascular system. The abundance of ion channels in the plasma membrane of these nonexcitable cells has raised questions about their functional role. This review presents evidence for the involvement of ion channels in endothelial cell functions controlled by intracellular Ca(2+) signals, such as the production and release of many vasoactive factors, e.g., nitric oxide and PGI(2). In addition, ion channels may be involved in the regulation of the traffic of macromolecules by endocytosis, transcytosis, the biosynthetic-secretory pathway, and exocytosis, e.g., tissue factor pathway inhibitor, von Willebrand factor, and tissue plasminogen activator. Ion channels are also involved in controlling intercellular permeability, EC proliferation, and angiogenesis. These functions are supported or triggered via ion channels, which either provide Ca(2+)-entry pathways or stabilize the driving force for Ca(2+) influx through these pathways. These Ca(2+)-entry pathways comprise agonist-activated nonselective Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels, cyclic nucleotide-activated nonselective cation channels, and store-operated Ca(2+) channels or capacitative Ca(2+) entry. At least some of these channels appear to be expressed by genes of the trp family. The driving force for Ca(2+) entry is mainly controlled by large-conductance Ca(2+)-dependent BK(Ca) channels (slo), inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (Kir2.1), and at least two types of Cl( -) channels, i.e., the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel and the housekeeping, volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC). In addition to their essential function in Ca(2+) signaling, VRAC channels are multifunctional, operate as a transport pathway for amino acids and organic osmolytes, and are possibly involved in endothelial cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Finally, we have also highlighted the role of ion channels as mechanosensors in EC. Plasmalemmal ion channels may signal rapid changes in hemodynamic forces, such as shear stress and biaxial tensile stress, but also changes in cell shape and cell volume to the cytoskeleton and the intracellular machinery for metabolite traffic and gene expression.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Acta Physiologica
                Acta Physiol
                Wiley
                17481708
                September 2017
                September 2017
                April 25 2017
                : 221
                : 1
                : 14-31
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Medical Ward 12; Trelleborg Hospital; Trelleborg Sweden
                [2 ]Department of Electrical Engineering; Technical University of Denmark; Kgs. Lyngby Denmark
                [3 ]Department of Biomedical Sciences; Division of Renal and Vascular Physiology; University of Copenhagen; Copenhagen Denmark
                Article
                10.1111/apha.12882
                © 2017

                Comments

                Comment on this article