299
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      RAPD and ISSR based evaluation of genetic stability of micropropagated plantlets of Morus alba L. variety S-1

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Plant regeneration through rapid in vitro clonal propagation of nodal explants of Morus alba L. variety S-1 was established along with genetic stability analysis of regenerates. Axillary shoot bud proliferation was achieved on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium in various culture regimes. Highest number of shoots (5.62 ± 0.01), with average length 4.19 ± 0.01 cm, was initially achieved with medium containing 0.5 mg/l N 6-benzyladenine (BA) and 3% sucrose. Repeated subculturing of newly formed nodal parts after each harvest up to sixth passage, yielded highest number of shoots (about 32.27) per explants was obtained after fourth passage. Rooting of shoots occurred on 1/2 MS medium supplemented with 1.0 mg/1 Indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). About 90% (89.16) of the plantlets transferred to the mixture of sand:soil:organic manure (2:2:1) in small plastic pots acclimatized successfully. Genetic stability of the discussed protocol was confirmed by two DNA-based fingerprinting techniques i.e. RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) and ISSR (inter-simple sequence repeat). This protocol can be used for commercial propagation and for future genetic improvement studies.

          Related collections

          Most cited references79

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Rapid isolation of high molecular weight plant DNA.

          A method is presented for the rapid isolation of high molecular weight plant DNA (50,000 base pairs or more in length) which is free of contaminants which interfere with complete digestion by restriction endonucleases. The procedure yields total cellular DNA (i.e. nuclear, chloroplast, and mitochondrial DNA). The technique is ideal for the rapid isolation of small amounts of DNA from many different species and is also useful for large scale isolations.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Genome fingerprinting by simple sequence repeat (SSR)-anchored polymerase chain reaction amplification.

            Simple sequence repeats (SSR), or microsatellites, are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes. Here we demonstrate the utility of microsatellite-directed DNA fingerprinting by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the interrepeat region. No sequencing is required to design the oligonucleotide primers. We tested primers anchored at 3' or 5' termini of the (CA)n repeats, extended into the flanking sequence by 2 to 4 nucleotide residues [3'-anchored primers: (CA)8RG, (CA)8RY, and (CA)7RTCY; and 5'-anchored primers: BDB(CA)7C, DBDA(CA)7, VHVG(TG)7 and HVH(TG)7T]. Radioactively labeled amplification products were analyzed by electrophoresis, revealing information on multiple genomic loci in a single gel lane. Complex, species-specific patterns were obtained from a variety of eukaryotic taxa. Intraspecies polymorphisms were also observed and shown to segregate as Mendelian markers. Inter-SSR PCR provides a novel fingerprinting approach applicable for taxonomic and phylogenetic comparisons and as a mapping tool in a wide range of organisms. This application of (CA)n repeats may be extended to different microsatellites and other common dispersed elements.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Somaclonal variation - a novel source of variability from cell cultures for plant improvement.

              It is concluded from a review of the literature that plant cell culture itself generates genetic variability (somaclonal variation). Extensive examples are discussed of such variation in culture subclones and in regenerated plants (somaclones). A number of possible mechanisms for the origin of this phenomenon are considered. It is argued that this variation already is proving to be of significance for plant improvement. In particular the phenomenon may be employed to enhance the exchange required in sexual hybrids for the introgression of desirable alien genes into a crop species. It may also be used to generate variants of a commercial cultivar in high frequency without hybridizing to other genotypes.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Meta Gene
                Meta Gene
                Meta Gene
                Elsevier
                2214-5400
                31 October 2015
                February 2016
                31 October 2015
                : 7
                : 7-15
                Affiliations
                [a ]Cytogenetics & Plant Biotechnology Research Unit, Department of Botany, University of Kalyani, Kalyani, 741235 Nadia, West Bengal, India
                [b ]Department of Botany, Kalyani Mahavidyalaya, City Centre Complex, Kalyani, Nadia 741235, West Bengal, India
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author. pdgbot@ 123456yahoo.co.in
                Article
                S2214-5400(15)00064-X
                10.1016/j.mgene.2015.10.004
                4660193
                26693403
                1279cc64-4d2d-4bcc-9798-fb3c3bc42e0e
                © 2015 The Authors

                This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

                History
                : 17 December 2014
                : 15 October 2015
                : 23 October 2015
                Categories
                Article

                in vitro,micropropagation,nodal explants,morus alba l. variety s-1,dna-based markers

                Comments

                Comment on this article