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      Analysis of ESR1 mutation in circulating tumor DNA demonstrates evolution during therapy for metastatic breast cancer.

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          Abstract

          Acquired ESR1 mutations are a major mechanism of resistance to aromatase inhibitors (AIs). We developed ultra high-sensitivity multiplex digital polymerase chain reaction assays for ESR1 mutations in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) and investigated the clinical relevance and origin of ESR1 mutations in 171 women with advanced breast cancer. ESR1 mutation status in ctDNA showed high concordance with contemporaneous tumor biopsies and was accurately assessed in samples shipped at room temperature in preservative tubes. ESR1 mutations were found exclusively in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients previously exposed to AI. Patients with ESR1 mutations had a substantially shorter progression-free survival on subsequent AI-based therapy [hazard ratio, 3.1; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.9 to 23.1; P = 0.0041]. ESR1 mutation prevalence differed markedly between patients who were first exposed to AI during the adjuvant and metastatic settings [5.8% (3 of 52) versus 36.4% (16 of 44), respectively; P = 0.0002]. In an independent cohort, ESR1 mutations were identified in 0% (0 of 32; 95% CI, 0 to 10.9) tumor biopsies taken after progression on adjuvant AI. In a patient with serial sampling, ESR1 mutation was selected during metastatic AI therapy to become the dominant clone in the cancer. ESR1 mutations can be robustly identified with ctDNA analysis and predict for resistance to subsequent AI therapy. ESR1 mutations are rarely acquired during adjuvant AI but are commonly selected by therapy for metastatic disease, providing evidence that mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy may be substantially different between the treatment of micrometastatic and overt metastatic cancer.

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          Most cited references 21

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          Is Open Access

          The Sequence Alignment/Map format and SAMtools

          Summary: The Sequence Alignment/Map (SAM) format is a generic alignment format for storing read alignments against reference sequences, supporting short and long reads (up to 128 Mbp) produced by different sequencing platforms. It is flexible in style, compact in size, efficient in random access and is the format in which alignments from the 1000 Genomes Project are released. SAMtools implements various utilities for post-processing alignments in the SAM format, such as indexing, variant caller and alignment viewer, and thus provides universal tools for processing read alignments. Availability: http://samtools.sourceforge.net Contact: rd@sanger.ac.uk
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            Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumors

            Summary We analyzed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, mRNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously-defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at > 10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the Luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein expression-defined subgroups, possibly contributed by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signaling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/p-HER2/HER1/p-HER1 signature within the HER2-Enriched expression subtype. Comparison of Basal-like breast tumors with high-grade Serous Ovarian tumors showed many molecular commonalities, suggesting a related etiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biologic finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biologic subtypes of breast cancer.
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              Emergence of KRAS mutations and acquired resistance to anti-EGFR therapy in colorectal cancer.

              A main limitation of therapies that selectively target kinase signalling pathways is the emergence of secondary drug resistance. Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that binds the extracellular domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), is effective in a subset of KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancers. After an initial response, secondary resistance invariably ensues, thereby limiting the clinical benefit of this drug. The molecular bases of secondary resistance to cetuximab in colorectal cancer are poorly understood. Here we show that molecular alterations (in most instances point mutations) of KRAS are causally associated with the onset of acquired resistance to anti-EGFR treatment in colorectal cancers. Expression of mutant KRAS under the control of its endogenous gene promoter was sufficient to confer cetuximab resistance, but resistant cells remained sensitive to combinatorial inhibition of EGFR and mitogen-activated protein-kinase kinase (MEK). Analysis of metastases from patients who developed resistance to cetuximab or panitumumab showed the emergence of KRAS amplification in one sample and acquisition of secondary KRAS mutations in 60% (6 out of 10) of the cases. KRAS mutant alleles were detectable in the blood of cetuximab-treated patients as early as 10 months before radiographic documentation of disease progression. In summary, the results identify KRAS mutations as frequent drivers of acquired resistance to cetuximab in colorectal cancers, indicate that the emergence of KRAS mutant clones can be detected non-invasively months before radiographic progression and suggest early initiation of a MEK inhibitor as a rational strategy for delaying or reversing drug resistance.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Sci Transl Med
                Science translational medicine
                1946-6242
                1946-6234
                Nov 11 2015
                : 7
                : 313
                Affiliations
                [1 ] The Breast Cancer Now Research Centre, The Institute of Cancer Research, London SW3 6JB, UK. Breast Unit, Royal Marsden Hospital, Fulham Road, London SW3 6JJ, UK.
                [2 ] The Breast Cancer Now Research Centre, The Institute of Cancer Research, London SW3 6JB, UK.
                [3 ] Breast Unit, Royal Marsden Hospital, Fulham Road, London SW3 6JJ, UK.
                [4 ] Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA.
                [5 ] The Breast Cancer Now Research Centre, The Institute of Cancer Research, London SW3 6JB, UK. Breast Unit, Royal Marsden Hospital, Fulham Road, London SW3 6JJ, UK. nicholas.turner@icr.ac.uk.
                Article
                7/313/313ra182 NIHMS803731
                10.1126/scitranslmed.aac7551
                26560360
                Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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