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      Measurement of Fructose–Asparagine Concentrations in Human and Animal Foods

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          Abstract

          <p class="first" id="P1">The food-borne bacterial pathogen, <i>Salmonella enterica</i>, can utilize fructose–asparagine (F–Asn) as its sole carbon and nitrogen source. F–Asn is the product of an Amadori rearrangement following the nonenzymatic condensation of glucose and asparagine. Heating converts F–Asn via complex Maillard reactions to a variety of molecules that contribute to the color, taste, and aroma of heated foods. Among these end derivatives is acrylamide, which is present in some foods, especially in fried potatoes. The F–Asn utilization pathway in <i>Salmonella</i>, specifically FraB, is a potential drug target because inhibition of this enzyme would lead to intoxication of <i>Salmonella</i> in the presence of F–Asn. However, F–Asn would need to be packaged with the FraB inhibitor or available in human foods. To determine if there are foods that have sufficient F–Asn, we measured F–Asn concentrations in a variety of human and animal foods. The 400 pmol/mg F–Asn found in mouse chow is sufficient to intoxicate a <i>Salmonella fraB</i> mutant in mouse models of salmonellosis, and several human foods were found to have F–Asn at this level or higher (fresh apricots, lettuce, asparagus, and canned peaches). Much higher concentrations (11000–35000 pmol/mg dry weight) were found in heat-dried apricots, apples, and asparagus. This report reveals possible origins of F–Asn as a nutrient source for <i>Salmonella</i> and identifies foods that could be used together with a FraB inhibitor as a therapeutic agent for <i>Salmonella</i>. </p>

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
          J. Agric. Food Chem.
          American Chemical Society (ACS)
          0021-8561
          1520-5118
          December 26 2017
          January 10 2018
          December 29 2017
          January 10 2018
          : 66
          : 1
          : 212-217
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, United States
          [2 ]Department of Microbial Infection and Immunity, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, United States
          [3 ]Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland 99352, Washington, United States
          [4 ]Signature Sciences and Technology Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland 99352, Washington, United States
          Article
          10.1021/acs.jafc.7b04237
          6191295
          29232127
          12959b87-8598-492d-933b-d01994432309
          © 2018
          History

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