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      Fate of RDX and TNT in agronomic plants.

      Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987)

      Agriculture, Biological Transport, Oryza sativa, Plant Roots, metabolism, Plant Shoots, Plants, Edible, Soil Pollutants, Soybeans, Triazines, Trinitrotoluene, Triticum, Zea mays

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          Abstract

          Phytoremediation is of great interest to remediate soil contaminated with hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). The ability of 4 agronomic plants (maize, soybean, wheat and rice) to take up these explosives and their fate in plants were investigated. Plants were grown for 42 days on soil contaminated with [(14)C]RDX or [(14)C]TNT. Then, each part was analyzed for its radioactivity content and the percentage of bound and soluble residues was determined following extractions. Extracts were analyzed by radio-HPLC. More than 80% of uptaken RDX was translocated to aerial tissues, up to 64.5 mgg(-1) of RDX. By contrast, TNT was little translocated to leaves since less than 25% of uptaken TNT was accumulated in aerial parts. Concentrations of TNT residues were 20 times lower than for RDX uptake. TNT was highly metabolized to bound residues (more than 50% of radioactivity) whereas RDX was mainly found in its parent form in aerial parts.

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          Journal
          17254682
          10.1016/j.envpol.2006.10.030

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