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      Predominately Uncultured Microbes as Sources of Bioactive Agents

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          Abstract

          In this short review, I am discussing the relatively recent awareness of the role of symbionts in plant, marine-invertebrates and fungal areas. It is now quite obvious that in marine-invertebrates, a majority of compounds found are from either as yet unculturable or poorly culturable microbes, and techniques involving “state of the art” genomic analyses and subsequent computerized analyses are required to investigate these interactions. In the plant kingdom evidence is amassing that endophytes (mainly fungal in nature) are heavily involved in secondary metabolite production and that mimicking the microbial interactions of fermentable microbes leads to involvement of previously unrecognized gene clusters (cryptic clusters is one name used), that when activated, produce previously unknown bioactive molecules.

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          Discovery of microbial natural products by activation of silent biosynthetic gene clusters.

          Microorganisms produce a wealth of structurally diverse specialized metabolites with a remarkable range of biological activities and a wide variety of applications in medicine and agriculture, such as the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer, and the prevention of crop damage. Genomics has revealed that many microorganisms have far greater potential to produce specialized metabolites than was thought from classic bioactivity screens; however, realizing this potential has been hampered by the fact that many specialized metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) are not expressed in laboratory cultures. In this Review, we discuss the strategies that have been developed in bacteria and fungi to identify and induce the expression of such silent BGCs, and we briefly summarize methods for the isolation and structural characterization of their metabolic products.
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            The evolution of genome mining in microbes - a review.

            Covering: 2006 to 2016The computational mining of genomes has become an important part in the discovery of novel natural products as drug leads. Thousands of bacterial genome sequences are publically available these days containing an even larger number and diversity of secondary metabolite gene clusters that await linkage to their encoded natural products. With the development of high-throughput sequencing methods and the wealth of DNA data available, a variety of genome mining methods and tools have been developed to guide discovery and characterisation of these compounds. This article reviews the development of these computational approaches during the last decade and shows how the revolution of next generation sequencing methods has led to an evolution of various genome mining approaches, techniques and tools. After a short introduction and brief overview of important milestones, this article will focus on the different approaches of mining genomes for secondary metabolites, from detecting biosynthetic genes to resistance based methods and "evo-mining" strategies including a short evaluation of the impact of the development of genome mining methods and tools on the field of natural products and microbial ecology.
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              An environmental bacterial taxon with a large and distinct metabolic repertoire.

              Cultivated bacteria such as actinomycetes are a highly useful source of biomedically important natural products. However, such 'talented' producers represent only a minute fraction of the entire, mostly uncultivated, prokaryotic diversity. The uncultured majority is generally perceived as a large, untapped resource of new drug candidates, but so far it is unknown whether taxa containing talented bacteria indeed exist. Here we report the single-cell- and metagenomics-based discovery of such producers. Two phylotypes of the candidate genus 'Entotheonella' with genomes of greater than 9 megabases and multiple, distinct biosynthetic gene clusters co-inhabit the chemically and microbially rich marine sponge Theonella swinhoei. Almost all bioactive polyketides and peptides known from this animal were attributed to a single phylotype. 'Entotheonella' spp. are widely distributed in sponges and belong to an environmental taxon proposed here as candidate phylum 'Tectomicrobia'. The pronounced bioactivities and chemical uniqueness of 'Entotheonella' compounds provide significant opportunities for ecological studies and drug discovery.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Front Microbiol
                Front Microbiol
                Front. Microbiol.
                Frontiers in Microbiology
                Frontiers Media S.A.
                1664-302X
                18 November 2016
                2016
                : 7
                : 1832
                Affiliations
                Newman Consulting LLC Wayne, PA, USA
                Author notes

                Edited by: Michael Thomas-Poulsen, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

                Reviewed by: Leo Van Overbeek, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Netherlands; Yasuo Yoshikuni, Joint Genome Institute, USA

                *Correspondence: David J. Newman, djnewman664@ 123456verizon.net

                This article was submitted to Antimicrobials, Resistance and Chemotherapy, a section of the journal Frontiers in Microbiology

                Article
                10.3389/fmicb.2016.01832
                5114300
                12a3b0f1-2260-42e5-b8a4-1ac87c550efa
                Copyright © 2016 Newman.

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

                History
                : 12 July 2016
                : 01 November 2016
                Page count
                Figures: 4, Tables: 0, Equations: 0, References: 145, Pages: 15, Words: 0
                Categories
                Microbiology
                Review

                Microbiology & Virology
                natural product sources,uncultured microbes,poor producing microbes,endophytes,microbe–microbe interactions

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