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      A scaling down mapping of Pinna nobilis (Linnaeus, 1758) through the combination of scientific literature, NATURA 2000, grey literature and citizen science data

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      Nature Conservation

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          This research investigates the occurrence of Pinna nobilis (Linnaeus, 1758) in the Mediterranean Sea, where it is an endemic and the largest bivalve species. Such a species is protected under the European Council Directive 92/43/EEC since 1992, being exposed to anthropogenic impacts. The distribution of this species has been known, in the past, only from reports in scientific literature. Presently, the concerns, threats and risks for P. nobilis are increasing and a more detailed mapping of the actual distribution from a largest to a local spatial scale is essential for the implementation of monitoring, management and conservation actions. Here we provide a systematic review on the occurrence of P. nobilis, employing and combining different sources of information, such as scientific and grey literature, NATURA 2000 geodata and citizen science records. The methodological approach is a pilot test based on a scaling down of the geographical area of study, from the whole of the Mediterranean Sea to the Italian and Apulian coastline (South-East Italy); accordingly, the above mentioned sources of data have been gradually included. The results show that the combination of multiple sources of information provide a more exact determination of the species distribution at a local scale, identifying sites where in-depth actions are required to ensure the species conservation and restoration. Also, the IUCN has recently underlined that the conservation of P. nobilis has become a difficult challenge, so that each of the spatial scales for the investigation is crucial to enable a better preservation and conservation of the species in the Mediterranean Sea.

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          Most cited references 15

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          S.O.S. Pinna nobilis: A Mass Mortality Event in Western Mediterranean Sea

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            Genetic improvement for disease resistance in oysters: A review.

            Oyster species suffer from numerous disease outbreaks, often causing high mortality. Because the environment cannot be controlled, genetic improvement for disease resistance to pathogens is an attractive option to reduce their impact on oyster production. We review the literature on selective breeding programs for disease resistance in oyster species, and the impact of triploidy on such resistance. Significant response to selection to improve disease resistance was observed in all studies after two to four generations of selection for Haplosporidium nelsoni and Roseovarius crassostrea in Crassostrea virginica, OsHV-1 in Crassostrea gigas, and Martelia sydneyi in Saccostrea glomerata. Clearly, resistance in these cases was heritable, but most of the studies failed to provide estimates for heritability or genetic correlations with other traits, e.g., between resistance to one disease and another. Generally, it seems breeding for higher resistance to one disease does not confer higher resistance or susceptibility to another disease. For disease resistance in triploid oysters, several studies showed that triploidy confers neither advantage nor disadvantage in survival, e.g., OsHV-1 resistance in C. gigas. Other studies showed higher disease resistance of triploids over diploid as observed in C. virginica and S. glomerata. One indirect mechanism for triploids to avoid disease was to grow faster, thus limiting the span of time when oysters might be exposed to disease.
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              Age, growth rate and season of recruitment of Pinna nobilis (L) in the Croatian Adriatic determined from Mg:Ca and Sr:Ca shell profiles

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Conservation
                NC
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-3301
                1314-6947
                April 18 2019
                April 18 2019
                : 33
                : 43-53
                Article
                10.3897/natureconservation.33.30397
                © 2019

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