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      Social Work Perspectives on the Voices of Children of Child Abuse

      Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

      Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

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          Abstract

          This study examined the consequences of child abuse on the life of children in Trinidad. Participants 12 female and 12 male who were victims of abuse. The impact of child abuse on the growth and living conditions of children in Trinidad were assessed by structured interviews. Participants were randomly selected from the clientele of Trinidad and Tobago Police Service Victim and Witness Support Unit and the Community Police Unit. The research revealed that there was a negative impact on the growth and living conditions of children who experience child abuse, usually resulting in feelings of depression; suicidal ideations; feelings of hatred toward abusing parent. This study found that physical abuse, verbal abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse and psychological abuse were the most common types of abuse perpetrated against children in Trinidad. Whereas it pertains to the existence of abuse in Trinidad, the study found that parents expected children to overcome their negative experiences, and achieve success despite the presence of abuse. In the face of the abuse, the researchers found that 66% of abusers will still ensure that their child’s basic needs were secured.

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          Most cited references 6

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          Disorders of extreme stress: The empirical foundation of a complex adaptation to trauma.

          Children and adults exposed to chronic interpersonal trauma consistently demonstrate psychological disturbances that are not captured in the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis. The DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) Field Trial studied 400 treatment-seeking traumatized individuals and 128 community residents and found that victims of prolonged interpersonal trauma, particularly trauma early in the life cycle, had a high incidence of problems with (a) regulation of affect and impulses, (b) memory and attention, (c) self-perception, (d) interpersonal relations, (e) somatization, and (f) systems of meaning. This raises important issues about the categorical versus the dimensional nature of posttraumatic stress, as well as the issue of comorbidity in PTSD. These data invite further exploration of what constitutes effective treatment of the full spectrum of posttraumatic psychopathology.
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            The long-term sequelae of child and adolescent abuse: A longitudinal community study

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              Identifying clinically distinct subgroups of self-injurers among young adults: a latent class analysis.

              High rates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI; 14%-17%) in adolescents and young adults suggest that some self-injurers may exhibit more or different psychiatric problems than others. In the present study, the authors utilized a latent class analysis to identify clinically distinct subgroups of self-injurers. Participants were 205 young adults with a history of 1 or more NSSI behaviors. Latent classes were identified on the basis of method (e.g., cutting vs. biting vs. burning), descriptive features (e.g., self-injuring alone or with others), and functions (i.e., social vs. automatic). The analysis yielded 4 subgroups of self-injurers, which were then compared on measures of depression, anxiety, borderline personality disorder, and suicidality. Almost 80% of participants belonged to 1 of 2 latent classes characterized by fewer or less severe NSSI behaviors and fewer clinical symptoms. A 3rd class (11% of participants) performed a variety of NSSI behaviors, endorsed both social and automatic functions, and was characterized by high anxiety. A 4th class (11% of participants) cut themselves in private, in the service of automatic functions, and was characterized by high suicidality. Clinical and research implications are discussed.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
                cswhi
                Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
                2222386X
                20769741
                July 30 2018
                July 28 2018
                July 30 2018
                July 28 2018
                : 9
                : 2
                : 46-53
                Article
                10.22359/cswhi_9_2_07
                © 2018

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Psychology, Social & Behavioral Sciences

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