16
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Precarious jobs: Where are they, and how do they affect well-being?

      The Economic and Labour Relations Review
      SAGE Publications

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references16

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Book: not found

          The Fissured Workplace

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The Employment Precariousness Scale (EPRES): psychometric properties of a new tool for epidemiological studies among waged and salaried workers.

            Despite the fact that labour market flexibility has resulted in an expansion of precarious employment in industrialised countries, to date there is limited empirical evidence concerning its health consequences. The Employment Precariousness Scale (EPRES) is a newly developed, theory-based, multidimensional questionnaire specifically devised for epidemiological studies among waged and salaried workers. To assess the acceptability, reliability and construct validity of EPRES in a sample of waged and salaried workers in Spain. A sample of 6968 temporary and permanent workers from a population-based survey carried out in 2004-2005 was analysed. The survey questionnaire was interviewer administered and included the six EPRES subscales, and measures of the psychosocial work environment (COPSOQ ISTAS21) and perceived general and mental health (SF-36). A high response rate to all EPRES items indicated good acceptability; Cronbach's alpha coefficients, over 0.70 for all subscales and the global score, demonstrated good internal consistency reliability; exploratory factor analysis using principal axis analysis and varimax rotation confirmed the six-subscale structure and the theoretical allocation of all items. Patterns across known groups and correlation coefficients with psychosocial work environment measures and perceived health demonstrated the expected relations, providing evidence of construct validity. Our results provide evidence in support of the psychometric properties of EPRES, which appears to be a promising tool for the measurement of employment precariousness in public health research.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              The hidden face of job insecurity

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                The Economic and Labour Relations Review
                The Economic and Labour Relations Review
                SAGE Publications
                1035-3046
                1838-2673
                July 26 2017
                July 26 2017
                : 28
                : 3
                : 402-419
                Article
                10.1177/1035304617722943
                13475840-48e5-47cb-b208-91333468f240
                © 2017

                http://journals.sagepub.com/page/policies/text-and-data-mining-license

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article