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      CCR1 and CCR5 promote hepatic fibrosis in mice

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          Most cited references 41

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          Liver fibrosis.

          Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins including collagen that occurs in most types of chronic liver diseases. Advanced liver fibrosis results in cirrhosis, liver failure, and portal hypertension and often requires liver transplantation. Our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of liver fibrosis has greatly advanced. Activated hepatic stellate cells, portal fibroblasts, and myofibroblasts of bone marrow origin have been identified as major collagen-producing cells in the injured liver. These cells are activated by fibrogenic cytokines such as TGF-beta1, angiotensin II, and leptin. Reversibility of advanced liver fibrosis in patients has been recently documented, which has stimulated researchers to develop antifibrotic drugs. Emerging antifibrotic therapies are aimed at inhibiting the accumulation of fibrogenic cells and/or preventing the deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. Although many therapeutic interventions are effective in experimental models of liver fibrosis, their efficacy and safety in humans is unknown. This review summarizes recent progress in the study of the pathogenesis and diagnosis of liver fibrosis and discusses current antifibrotic strategies.
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            Hepatic stellate cells: protean, multifunctional, and enigmatic cells of the liver.

            The hepatic stellate cell has surprised and engaged physiologists, pathologists, and hepatologists for over 130 years, yet clear evidence of its role in hepatic injury and fibrosis only emerged following the refinement of methods for its isolation and characterization. The paradigm in liver injury of activation of quiescent vitamin A-rich stellate cells into proliferative, contractile, and fibrogenic myofibroblasts has launched an era of astonishing progress in understanding the mechanistic basis of hepatic fibrosis progression and regression. But this simple paradigm has now yielded to a remarkably broad appreciation of the cell's functions not only in liver injury, but also in hepatic development, regeneration, xenobiotic responses, intermediary metabolism, and immunoregulation. Among the most exciting prospects is that stellate cells are essential for hepatic progenitor cell amplification and differentiation. Equally intriguing is the remarkable plasticity of stellate cells, not only in their variable intermediate filament phenotype, but also in their functions. Stellate cells can be viewed as the nexus in a complex sinusoidal milieu that requires tightly regulated autocrine and paracrine cross-talk, rapid responses to evolving extracellular matrix content, and exquisite responsiveness to the metabolic needs imposed by liver growth and repair. Moreover, roles vital to systemic homeostasis include their storage and mobilization of retinoids, their emerging capacity for antigen presentation and induction of tolerance, as well as their emerging relationship to bone marrow-derived cells. As interest in this cell type intensifies, more surprises and mysteries are sure to unfold that will ultimately benefit our understanding of liver physiology and the diagnosis and treatment of liver disease.
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              TLR4 enhances TGF-beta signaling and hepatic fibrosis.

              Hepatic injury is associated with a defective intestinal barrier and increased hepatic exposure to bacterial products. Here we report that the intestinal bacterial microflora and a functional Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), but not TLR2, are required for hepatic fibrogenesis. Using Tlr4-chimeric mice and in vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge, we demonstrate that quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the main precursors for myofibroblasts in the liver, are the predominant target through which TLR4 ligands promote fibrogenesis. In quiescent HSCs, TLR4 activation not only upregulates chemokine secretion and induces chemotaxis of Kupffer cells, but also downregulates the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta pseudoreceptor Bambi to sensitize HSCs to TGF-beta-induced signals and allow for unrestricted activation by Kupffer cells. LPS-induced Bambi downregulation and sensitization to TGF-beta is mediated by a MyD88-NF-kappaB-dependent pathway. Accordingly, Myd88-deficient mice have decreased hepatic fibrosis. Thus, modulation of TGF-beta signaling by a TLR4-MyD88-NF-kappaB axis provides a novel link between proinflammatory and profibrogenic signals.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Clinical Investigation
                J. Clin. Invest.
                American Society for Clinical Investigation
                0021-9738
                June 15 2009
                Article
                10.1172/JCI37444
                © 2009
                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://www.jci.org/articles/view/37444

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