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      INDOOR THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF VENTILATED DWELLINGS USING FLY SCREENS IN THE HOT-HUMID CLIMATE OF CHENNAI, INDIA

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          Abstract

          In a hot-humid tropical climate, indoor thermal performance can be enhanced by comfort ventilation. Indoor ventilation depends upon building opening size. But risks involved in providing openings include ingress of mosquitoes and insects which thrive in the tropical climate. A practical and prevalent option to prevent insects in ventilated dwellings of the tropical, hot-humid city of Chennai, India is through the use of fly screens. Fly screens, when used over openings, prevent a certain quantum of solar radiation and wind from entering inside the rooms. Reduced direct solar radiation prevents the indoors from heating up, while reduced wind movement prevents the cross ventilation. Therefore, it is important to know the indoor thermal performance of ventilated rooms in the presence of fly screens with changing opening sizes. The criterion to evaluate indoor thermal performance in this paper is indoor air temperature. The aim of this research is to investigate the influence of fly screens on openings with varying sizes, in a naturally ventilated dwelling in the hot-humid climate of Chennai, India, during the summer period. The results of the study show that fly screens raise the indoor air temperature when openings are in the range of 100% to 35% of the room floor area. There is no significant change in the indoor air temperature when the opening sizes are less than 30% of the room floor area.

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          Most cited references 13

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          The mosquito problem and type and costs of personal protection measures used in rural and urban communities in Pondicherry region, South India.

          Personal protection measures have become an important tool against mosquito nuisance. The severity of mosquito nuisance and the type and costs of personal protection measures in the Pondicherry region in South India have been investigated, using a structured questionnaire. The number of respondents sampled was 300 in the urban area and 100 in rural areas. 87 and 63% of the urban and rural respondents, respectively, felt that mosquito nuisance was severe in their locality. 83% of the urban and 27% of the rural respondents are aware that mosquitoes transmit diseases and were able to name at least one mosquito-borne disease. All the neighbourhood shops in urban and a majority in rural areas stocked personal protection products. As many as 99.3 and 73% of the urban and rural respondents, respectively, were found to use personal-protection measures during some or all seasons of the year. Mosquito coils were the most widely used measure in both urban and rural areas, followed by vaporising mats in the former and electric fans in the latter areas. 48 and 40% in urban and rural areas, respectively, used personal-protection measures daily. In urban areas 46% used the measures in more than one room. Only a small proportion (3-14%) used bed nets. The average monthly expenditure on the measures was Rupees (Rs.) 62.17 (US$ 1.30) (range: Rs. 0.00-500.00) in urban areas and Rs. 8.03 (US$ 0.17) (range Rs. 0.00-45.00) in rural areas. Annual expenditure on personal protection measures in urban areas amounted to 0.63% of the per capita income. 73.7% of the respondents in urban areas expressed satisfaction with the protective effect of the measures used by them. However, 46.3% of the urban and 15% of the rural respondents felt that the personal-protection measures are harmful to health. Some of the perceived harmful effects are allergy, breathing problems, cough and head ache.
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            Natural ventilation design for houses in Thailand

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              Manual of Tropical Housing and Building

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1552-6100
                1943-4618
                1943-4618
                Spring 2009
                : 4
                : 2
                : 150-157
                Author notes

                1Dr. Vijayalaxmi J. M.Arch, Ph.D, Asst. Professor, Dept. of Architecture, School of Architecture and Planning, Anna University Chennai, India; vijayalaxmij@ 123456annauniv.edu .

                2Dr. S.P.Sekar, Professor and Head, Dept. of Planning, School of Architecture and Planning, Anna University Chennai, India. sekar@ 123456annauniv.edu .

                Article
                jgb.4.2.150
                10.3992/jgb.4.2.150
                ©2009 by College Publishing. All rights reserved.

                Volumes 1-7 of JOGB are open access and do not require permission for use, though proper citation should be given. To view the licenses, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

                Page count
                Pages: 8
                Product
                Categories
                RESEARCH ARTICLES

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