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      Behavioural Contagion in Hong Kong Urban Space under Mass Psychological Distress.

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      Environment-Behaviour Proceedings Journal
      e-IPH Ltd.

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          Abstract

          Psychological factors affecting human behaviour ‘a priori’ are largely underestimated in the contemporary urban debate. Mass psychological distress is not considered as a factor affecting urban dynamics within city-spaces. This study compares activities, preferences, and psychological dynamics related to behavioural contagion theory towards urban spaces in Hong Kong before and after COVID-19. Results showed significant transitions in preferences among shopping malls and urban green spaces for stationary uses, paired with substantial changes at the destination decision-making process. Other than behavioural tendencies, these results provide directions for discussing the integration of mass psychological distress into future urban scenarios design.   

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Environment-Behaviour Proceedings Journal
          E-BPJ
          e-IPH Ltd.
          2398-4287
          July 01 2020
          July 01 2020
          : 5
          : 14
          : 303-310
          Article
          10.21834/ebpj.v5i14.2161
          14ab9b50-871b-46e2-9abc-8ef9f5fb075e
          © 2020

          This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/


          Psychology,Urban design & Planning,Urban studies,General behavioral science,Cultural studies

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