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      Effects of recombinant growth hormone (GH) replacement and psychomotor and cognitive stimulation in the neurodevelopment of GH-deficient (GHD) children with cerebral palsy: a pilot study

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          Abstract

          Cerebral palsy (CP) is the main cause of physical disability in childhood and is an important health issue that has a strong socioeconomic impact. There is no effective treatment for CP and therapeutic approaches report only partial benefits for affected people. In this study we assessed the effects of growth hormone (GH) treatment combined with psychomotor and cognitive stimulation in the neurodevelopment of children with CP and GH deficiency (GHD). The study was carried out in 11 patients (7 boys and 4 girls; 4.12 ± 1.31 years) with GHD and CP who were treated with recombinant GH (rGH) and psychomotor and cognitive stimulation during 2 months. Battelle Developmental Inventory Screening Test (BDIST) was performed 2 months before commencing GH treatment, just before commencing GH administration, and after 2 months of combined treatment involving GH and cognitive stimulation. Psychomotor and cognitive status did not change during the period in which only cognitive stimulation was performed; however, significant improvements in personal and social skills, adaptive behavior, gross motor skills and total psychomotor abilities, receptive and total communication, cognitive skills and in the total score of the test ( P < 0.01), and in fine motor skills and expressive communication ( P < 0.02) were observed after the combined treatment period. Therefore, GH replacement together with psychomotor and cognitive stimulation seem to be useful for the appropriate neurodevelopment of children with GHD and CP.

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          Most cited references 26

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          Development and reliability of a system to classify gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy.

          To address the need for a standardized system to classify the gross motor function of children with cerebral palsy, the authors developed a five-level classification system analogous to the staging and grading systems used in medicine. Nominal group process and Delphi survey consensus methods were used to examine content validity and revise the classification system until consensus among 48 experts (physical therapists, occupational therapists, and developmental pediatricians with expertise in cerebral palsy) was achieved. Interrater reliability (kappa) was 0.55 for children less than 2 years of age and 0.75 for children 2 to 12 years of age. The classification system has application for clinical practice, research, teaching, and administration.
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            Aspects of Growth Hormone and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Related to Neuroprotection, Regeneration, and Functional Plasticity in the Adult Brain

            Apart from regulating somatic growth and metabolic processes, accumulating evidence suggests that the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) axis is involved in the regulation of brain growth, development, and myelination. In addition, both GH and IGF-I affect cognition and biochemistry in the adult brain. Some of the effects of GH are attributable to circulating IGF-I, while others may be due to IGF-I produced locally within the brain. Some of the shared effects in common to GH and IGF-I may also be explained by cross-talk between the GH and IGF-I transduction pathways, as indicated by recent data from other cell systems. Otherwise, it also seems that GH may act directly without involving IGF-I (either circulating or locally). Plasticity in the central nervous system (CNS) may be viewed as changes in the functional interplay between the major cell types, neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. GH and IGF-I affect all three of these cell types in several ways. Apart from the neuroprotective effects of GH and IGF-I posited in different experimental models of CNS injury, IGF-I has been found to increase progenitor cell proliferation and new neurons, oligodendrocytes, and blood vessels in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. It appears that the MAPK signaling pathway is required for IGF-I—stimulated proliferation in vitro, whereas the PI3K/Akt or MAPK/Erk signaling pathway appears to mediate antiapoptotic effects. The increase of IGF-I on endothelial cell phenotype may explain the increase in cerebral arteriole density observed after GH treatment. The functional role of GH and IGF-I in the adult brain will be reviewed with reference to neurotransmitters, glucose metabolism, cerebral blood flow, gap junctional communication, dendritic arborization, exercise, enriched environment, depression, learning, memory, and aging.Briefly, these findings suggest that IGF-I functions as a putative regenerative agent in the adult CNS. Hitherto less studied regarding in these aspects, GH may have similar effects, especially as it is the main regulator of IGF-I in vivo. Some of the positive cognitive features of GH treatment are likely attributable to the mechanisms reviewed here.
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              Plasticity in the developing brain: implications for rehabilitation.

               Eric Johnston (2008)
              Neuronal plasticity allows the central nervous system to learn skills and remember information, to reorganize neuronal networks in response to environmental stimulation, and to recover from brain and spinal cord injuries. Neuronal plasticity is enhanced in the developing brain and it is usually adaptive and beneficial but can also be maladaptive and responsible for neurological disorders in some situations. Basic mechanisms that are involved in plasticity include neurogenesis, programmed cell death, and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Repetitive stimulation of synapses can cause long-term potentiation or long-term depression of neurotransmission. These changes are associated with physical changes in dendritic spines and neuronal circuits. Overproduction of synapses during postnatal development in children contributes to enhanced plasticity by providing an excess of synapses that are pruned during early adolescence. Clinical examples of adaptive neuronal plasticity include reorganization of cortical maps of the fingers in response to practice playing a stringed instrument and constraint-induced movement therapy to improve hemiparesis caused by stroke or cerebral palsy. These forms of plasticity are associated with structural and functional changes in the brain that can be detected with magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). TMS and other forms of brain stimulation are also being used experimentally to enhance brain plasticity and recovery of function. Plasticity is also influenced by genetic factors such as mutations in brain-derived neuronal growth factor. Understanding brain plasticity provides a basis for developing better therapies to improve outcome from acquired brain injuries. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-6336
                1178-203X
                2011
                2011
                30 May 2011
                : 7
                : 199-206
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Medical Center “Proyecto Foltra”, Cacheiras (Teo), A Coruña, Spain;
                [2 ]Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Jesús Devesa, Medical Center “Proyecto Foltra”, Cacheiras 64 (Teo), A Coruña, Spain, 15886, Tel +34-981802928, Fax +34-981802928, Email jesus.devesa@ 123456usc.es
                Article
                tcrm-7-199
                10.2147/TCRM.S21403
                3116807
                21691590
                © 2011 Devesa et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.

                This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Medicine

                growth hormone, cerebral palsy, cognitive functions, battelle’s test, neurodevelopment

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