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      Gender Differences in Receptivity to Sexual Offers: A New Research Prototype

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          Abstract

          Among the most cited series of experiments in social and evolutionary psychology are those conducted by Clark and Hatfield (1989, 2003). In these studies, college students served as confederates in a simple field experiment. They approached fellow college students of another gender and asked one of three questions: (a) “Would you go out with me tonight?” (b) “Would you come over to my apartment tonight?” or (c) “Would you go to bed with me tonight?” Men and women differed markedly in their receptivity to casual sexual offers. When asked: “Would you go out with me tonight?” both were equally receptive. Yet, when confederates asked, “Would you come over to my apartment” or “Would you go to bed with me?” gender differences were striking. In the following series of experiments we attempted to develop a pencil and paper method to mirror the procedure of the classic study. We think we succeeded. Although cultural and social considerations may have influenced participants’ tendency to accept or reject sexual offers, as predicted by evolutionary perspectives, in all three experiments men were more likely than women to accept sexual offers. The studies also explored some of the reasons men and women gave for refusing a date, apartment visit, or a sexual encounter. We close by itemizing some questions that, given this new set of research materials, may be worth asking.

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          Sexual strategies theory: an evolutionary perspective on human mating.

          This article proposes a contextual-evolutionary theory of human mating strategies. Both men and women are hypothesized to have evolved distinct psychological mechanisms that underlie short-term and long-term strategies. Men and women confront different adaptive problems in short-term as opposed to long-term mating contexts. Consequently, different mate preferences become activated from their strategic repertoires. Nine key hypotheses and 22 predictions from Sexual Strategies Theory are outlined and tested empirically. Adaptive problems sensitive to context include sexual accessibility, fertility assessment, commitment seeking and avoidance, immediate and enduring resource procurement, paternity certainty, assessment of mate value, and parental investment. Discussion summarizes 6 additional sources of behavioral data, outlines adaptive problems common to both sexes, and suggests additional contexts likely to cause shifts in mating strategy.
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            Beauty and the beast: mechanisms of sexual selection in humans

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              Gender Differences in Receptivity to Sexual Offers

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                IJPR
                Interpersona
                Interpersona
                An International Journal on Personal Relationships
                Interpersona
                PsychOpen
                1981-6472
                20 December 2013
                : 7
                : 2
                : 323-344
                Affiliations
                [a ]University of Hawaii at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI, USA
                Author notes
                [* ]Department of Psychology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822. elaineh@ 123456hawaii.edu
                Article
                ijpr.v7i2.121
                10.5964/ijpr.v7i2.121
                151c5a04-2eca-47bc-9f4b-25cbb54ba912
                Copyright @

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                History
                : 05 May 2013
                : 18 November 2013
                Categories
                Articles

                Psychology
                casual sex,receptivity to sexual offers,sexual offers,gender
                Psychology
                casual sex, receptivity to sexual offers, sexual offers, gender

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