0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Numerical Analysis for Non-Uniformity of Balloon-Expandable Stent Deployment Driven by Dogboning and Foreshortening

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references32

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Patterns and mechanisms of in-stent restenosis. A serial intravascular ultrasound study.

          Studies have suggested that restenosis within Palmaz-Schatz stents results from neointimal hyperplasia or chronic stent recoil and occurs more frequently at the articulation. Serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was performed after intervention and at follow-up in 142 stents in 115 lesions. IVUS measurements (external elastic membrane [EEM], stent, and lumen cross-sectional areas [CSAs] and diameters) were performed, and plaque CSA (EEM lumen in reference segments and stent lumen in stented segments), late lumen loss (delta lumen), remodeling (delta EEM in reference segments and delta stent in stented segments), and tissue growth (delta plaque) were calculated. After intervention, the lumen tended to be smallest at the articulation because of tissue prolapse. At follow-up, tissue growth was uniformly distributed throughout the stent; the tendency for greater neointimal tissue accumulation at the central articulation reached statistical significance only when normalized for the smaller postintervention lumen CSA. In stented segments, late lumen area loss correlated strongly with tissue growth but only weakly with remodeling. Stents affected adjacent vessel segments; remodeling progressively increased and tissue growth progressively decreased at distances from the edge of the stent. These findings were similar in native arteries and saphenous vein grafts and in lesions treated with one or two stents. There was no difference in the postintervention or follow-up lumen (at the junction of the two stents) when overlapped were compared with nonoverlapped stents. Late lumen loss and in-stent restenosis were the result of neointimal tissue proliferation, which tended to be uniformly distributed over the length of the stent.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Cardiovascular stent design and vessel stresses: a finite element analysis.

            Intravascular stents of various designs are currently in use to restore patency in atherosclerotic coronary arteries and it has been found that different stents have different in-stent restenosis rates. It has been hypothesized that the level of vascular injury caused to a vessel by a stent determines the level of restenosis. Computational studies may be used to investigate the mechanical behaviour of stents and to determine the biomechanical interaction between the stent and the artery in a stenting procedure. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that two different stent designs will provoke different levels of stress within an atherosclerotic artery and hence cause different levels of vascular injury. The stents analysed using the finite-element method were the S7 (Medtronic AVE) and the NIR (Boston Scientific) stent designs. An analysis of the arterial wall stresses in the stented arteries indicates that the modular S7 stent design causes lower stress to an atherosclerotic vessel with a localized stenotic lesion compared to the slotted tube NIR design. These results correlate with observed clinical restenosis rates, which have found higher restenosis rates in the NIR compared with the S7 stent design. Therefore, the testing methodology outlined here is proposed as a pre-clinical testing tool, which could be used to compare and contrast existing stent designs and to develop novel stent designs.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Restenosis: delineating the numerous causes of drug-eluting stent restenosis.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Cardiovascular Engineering and Technology
                Cardiovasc Eng Tech
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                1869-408X
                1869-4098
                April 2022
                August 24 2021
                April 2022
                : 13
                : 2
                : 247-264
                Article
                10.1007/s13239-021-00573-4
                34431035
                156855a9-3b93-4f49-a684-8d953c835761
                © 2022

                https://www.springer.com/tdm

                https://www.springer.com/tdm

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article