31
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Study of the reparative effects of menstrual-derived stem cells on premature ovarian failure in mice

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          Young female patients who receive chemotherapy frequently face premature ovarian failure (POF). The therapeutic potential of stem cells in these patients has been explored in stem cells derived from different sources. However, many of these types of stem cells are either difficult to obtain or obtaining them involves invasive procedures. Here, we show that menstrual-derived stem cells (MenSCs) are easy to access and exhibit mesenchymal stem cell-like properties. MenSCs are therefore a novel source of stem cells that can be used for tissue repair. The aim of this study was to explore the reparative capacity and the mechanism underlying the activities of MenSCs.

          Methods

          POF mouse models were established by 7 consecutive days of intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin, and then MenSCs or MenSC-derived conditioned media (CM) were infused via the tail vein. The ovaries were excised after either 7 or 21 days of treatment and the follicles were counted and categorized. Apoptosis of granulosa cells was observed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labelling staining. Ovarian function was evaluated by monitoring serum sex hormone levels. Furthermore, MenSC tracking, Q-PCR, and small interfering RNA transfection were used to reveal the inner mechanism of repair.

          Results

          MenSC transplantation could improve the ovarian microenvironment by reducing apoptosis in granulosa cells and the fibrosis of ovarian interstitium, which contributes to increase the follicular numbers and return sex hormone levels to normal values. Meanwhile, the transplanted MenSCs directively migrate to ovarian interstitium to play a role in repair rather than differentiate to oocytes directly. Additionally, MenSCs and CM derived from these cells exerted protective effects on damaged ovaries partially by secreting FGF2.

          Conclusion

          MenSCs repair ovarian injury, improve ovarian function, and stimulate regeneration, suggesting that transplantation of MenSCs may provide an effective and novel method for treating POF.

          Related collections

          Most cited references42

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Mouse Estrous Cycle Identification Tool and Images

          The efficiency of producing timed pregnant or pseudopregnant mice can be increased by identifying those in proestrus or estrus. Visual observation of the vagina is the quickest method, requires no special equipment, and is best used when only proestrus or estrus stages need to be identified. Strain to strain differences, especially in coat color can make it difficult to determine the stage of the estrous cycle accurately by visual observation. Presented here are a series of images of the vaginal opening at each stage of the estrous cycle for 3 mouse strains of different coat colors: black (C57BL/6J), agouti (CByB6F1/J) and albino (BALB/cByJ). When all 4 stages (proestrus, estrus, metestrus, and diestrus) need to be identified, vaginal cytology is regarded as the most accurate method. An identification tool is presented to aid the user in determining the stage of estrous when using vaginal cytology. These images and descriptions are an excellent resource for learning how to determine the stage of the estrous cycle by visual observation or vaginal cytology.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Endometrial regenerative cells: A novel stem cell population

            Angiogenesis is a critical component of the proliferative endometrial phase of the menstrual cycle. Thus, we hypothesized that a stem cell-like population exist and can be isolated from menstrual blood. Mononuclear cells collected from the menstrual blood contained a subpopulation of adherent cells which could be maintained in tissue culture for >68 doublings and retained expression of the markers CD9, CD29, CD41a, CD44, CD59, CD73, CD90 and CD105, without karyotypic abnormalities. Proliferative rate of the cells was significantly higher than control umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells, with doubling occurring every 19.4 hours. These cells, which we termed "Endometrial Regenerative Cells" (ERC) were capable of differentiating into 9 lineages: cardiomyocytic, respiratory epithelial, neurocytic, myocytic, endothelial, pancreatic, hepatic, adipocytic, and osteogenic. Additionally, ERC produced MMP3, MMP10, GM-CSF, angiopoietin-2 and PDGF-BB at 10–100,000 fold higher levels than two control cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cell lines. Given the ease of extraction and pluripotency of this cell population, we propose ERC as a novel alternative to current stem cells sources.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Isolation and culture of epithelial progenitors and mesenchymal stem cells from human endometrium.

              Human endometrium is a highly regenerative tissue undergoing more than 400 cycles of growth, differentiation, and shedding during a woman's reproductive years. Endometrial regeneration is likely mediated by adult stem/progenitor cells. This study investigated key stem cell properties of individual clonogenic epithelial and stromal cells obtained from human endometrium. Single-cell suspensions of endometrial epithelial or stromal cells were obtained from hysterectomy tissues from 15 women experiencing normal menstrual cycles, and were cultured at clonal density (10 cells/cm(2)) or limiting dilution. The adult stem cell properties-self-renewal, high proliferative potential, and differentiation of single epithelial and stromal cells-were assessed by harvesting individual colonies and undertaking serial clonal culture, serial passaging, and culture in differentiation-induction media, respectively. Lineage differentiation markers were examined by RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry. Rare single human endometrial EpCAM(+) epithelial cells and EpCAM(-) stromal cells demonstrated self-renewal by serially cloning >3 times and underwent >30 population doublings over 4 mo in culture. Clonally derived epithelial cells differentiated into cytokeratin(+) gland-like structures in three dimensional culture. Single stromal cells were multipotent, as their progeny differentiated into smooth muscle cells, adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts. Stromal clones expressed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers ITGB1 (CD29), CD44, NT5E (CD73), THY1 (CD90), ENG (CD105), PDGFRB (CD140B), MCAM (CD146) but not endothelial or hemopoietic markers PECAM1 (CD31), CD34, PTPRC (CD45). Adult human endometrium contains rare epithelial progenitors and MSCs, likely responsible for its immense regenerative capacity, which may also have critical roles in the development of endometriosis and endometrial cancer. Human endometrium may provide a readily available source of MSCs for cell-based therapies.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                287606792@qq.com
                2216822390@qq.com
                sharpyting@126.com
                li-jing-smile@163.com
                m18991232845@163.com
                Journal
                Stem Cell Res Ther
                Stem Cell Res Ther
                Stem Cell Research & Therapy
                BioMed Central (London )
                1757-6512
                23 January 2017
                23 January 2017
                2017
                : 8
                : 11
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0001 0599 1243, GRID grid.43169.39, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, , First Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, ; Xi’an, 710061 People’s Republic of China
                [2 ]GRID grid.452438.c, Center for Translational Medicine, , First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University, ; Xi’an, 710061 People’s Republic of China
                Article
                458
                10.1186/s13287-016-0458-1
                5259841
                28114977
                15b29451-6db8-4379-af1a-996a11037549
                © The Author(s). 2017

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

                History
                : 12 August 2016
                : 1 November 2016
                : 15 December 2016
                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001809, National Natural Science Foundation of China;
                Award ID: 81571393
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100002858, China Postdoctoral Science Foundation;
                Award ID: 2015M582676
                Award Recipient :
                Categories
                Research
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2017

                Molecular medicine
                premature ovarian failure,menstrual-derived stem cells,paracrine,fibroblast growth factor 2

                Comments

                Comment on this article