9
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      A survey of interfering shoulder pain in United States competitive swimmers

      ,
      The American Journal of Sports Medicine
      SAGE Publications

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references15

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Inferior capsular shift for involuntary inferior and multidirectional instability of the shoulder. A preliminary report.

          In thirty-six patients (forty shoulders) with involuntary inferior and multidirectional subluxation and dislocation, there had been failure of standard operations or uncertainty regarding diagnosis or treatment. Clinical evaluation of these patients stressed meticulous psychiatric appraisal, conservative treatment, and repeated examination of the shoulder. All patients were treated by an inferior capsular shift, a procedure in which a flap of the capsule reinforced by overlying tendon is shifted to reduce capsular and ligamentous redundancy on all three sides. This technique offers the advantage of correcting multidirectional instability through one incision without damage to the articular surface. One shoulder began subluxating again within seven months after operation, but there have been no other unsatisfactory results to date. Seventeen shoulders were followed for more than two years.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Effect of reduced training on muscular strength and endurance in competitive swimmers.

            Following 5 months of competitive training (approximately 9,000 yards.d-1, 6 d.wk-1), three groups of eight male swimmers performed 4 wk of either reduced training (3,000 yard.session-1) or inactivity. Two groups reduced their training to either 3 sessions.wk-1 (RT3) or 1 session.wk-1 (RT1), whereas the third group (IA) did no training. Measurement of muscular strength (biokinetic swim bench) showed no decrement in any group over the 4 wk. In contrast, swim power (tethered swim) was significantly decreased (P less than 0.05) in all groups, reaching a mean change of -13.6% by week 4. Blood lactate measured after a standard 200-yard (183 m) front crawl swim increased by 1.8, 3.5, and 5.5 mM over the 4 wk in groups RT3, RT1 and IA, respectively. In group RT1, stroke rate measured during the 200-yard swim significantly increased (P less than 0.05) from 0.54 +/- 0.03 to 0.59 +/- 0.03 strokes.-1 while stroke distance significantly decreased (P less than 0.05) from 2.50 +/- 0.08 to 2.29 +/- 0.13 m.stroke-1 during the 4-wk period. Both stroke rate and stroke distance were maintained in group RT3 over the 4 wk of reduced training. Group IA was not tested for stroke mechanics. Whereas maximal oxygen uptake decreases significantly (P less than 0.05) over the 4 wk in group RT1 (4.75 to 4.62 l.min-1), no change in maximal oxygen uptake was observed in group RT3. These results suggest that aerobic capacity is maintained over 4 wk of moderately reduced training (3 sessions.wk-1) in well-trained swimmers. Muscular strength was not diminished over 4 wk of reduced training or inactivity, but the ability to generate power during swimming was significantly reduced in all groups.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Orthopaedic manifestations of swimming.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                The American Journal of Sports Medicine
                Am J Sports Med
                SAGE Publications
                0363-5465
                1552-3365
                April 23 2016
                April 23 2016
                : 21
                : 1
                : 67-70
                Article
                10.1177/036354659302100112
                16168351-6060-4592-971f-de48f943bab4
                © 2016
                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article