0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Functional divergence of thyrotropin beta-subunit paralogs gives new insights into salmon smoltification metamorphosis

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Smoltification is a metamorphic event in salmon life history, which initiates downstream migration and pre-adapts juvenile salmon for seawater entry. While a number of reports concern thyroid hormones and smoltification, few and inconclusive studies have addressed the potential role of thyrotropin (TSH). TSH is composed of a α-subunit common to gonadotropins, and a β-subunit conferring hormone specificity. We report the presence and functional divergence of duplicated TSH β-subunit paralogs ( tshβa and tshβb) in Atlantic salmon. Phylogeny and synteny analyses allowed us to infer that they originated from teleost-specific whole genome duplication. Expression profiles of both paralogs in the pituitary were measured by qPCR throughout smoltification in Atlantic salmon from the endangered Loire-Allier population raised in a conservation hatchery. This revealed a striking peak of tshβb expression in April, concomitant with downstream migration initiation, while tshβa expression remained relatively constant. In situ hybridization showed two distinct pituitary cell populations, tshβa cells in the anterior adenohypophysis, and tshβb cells near to the pituitary stalk, a location comparable to the pars tuberalis TSH cells involved in seasonal physiology and behaviour in birds and mammals. Functional divergence of tshβ paralogs in Atlantic salmon supports a specific role of tshβb in smoltification.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 54

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Smolt Transformation: Evolution, Behavior, and Physiology

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Thyrotrophin in the pars tuberalis triggers photoperiodic response.

            Molecular mechanisms regulating animal seasonal breeding in response to changing photoperiod are not well understood. Rapid induction of gene expression of thyroid-hormone-activating enzyme (type 2 deiodinase, DIO2) in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) of the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) is the earliest event yet recorded in the photoperiodic signal transduction pathway. Here we show cascades of gene expression in the quail MBH associated with the initiation of photoinduced secretion of luteinizing hormone. We identified two waves of gene expression. The first was initiated about 14 h after dawn of the first long day and included increased thyrotrophin (TSH) beta-subunit expression in the pars tuberalis; the second occurred approximately 4 h later and included increased expression of DIO2. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of TSH to short-day quail stimulated gonadal growth and expression of DIO2 which was shown to be mediated through a TSH receptor-cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling pathway. Increased TSH in the pars tuberalis therefore seems to trigger long-day photoinduced seasonal breeding.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Methods for Nonlethal Gill Biopsy and Measurement of Na+, K+-ATPase Activity

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                sylvie.dufour@mnhn.fr
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                14 March 2019
                14 March 2019
                2019
                : 9
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2308 1657, GRID grid.462844.8, Biology of Aquatic Organisms and Ecosystems (BOREA), Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, CNRS, IRD, , Sorbonne Université, Université de Caen Normandie, Université des Antilles, ; 75231 Paris, Cedex 05 France
                [2 ]Conservatoire National du Saumon Sauvage, 43300 Chanteuges, France
                [3 ]ISNI 0000 0004 0607 975X, GRID grid.19477.3c, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, , Norwegian University of Life Sciences, ; 0102 Oslo, Norway
                [4 ]Future Genomics Technologies B.V, 2333 BE Leiden, Netherlands
                [5 ]US Geological Survey, Leetown Science Center, Conte Anadromous Fish Research Laboratory, Turners Falls, MA USA
                Article
                40019
                10.1038/s41598-019-40019-5
                6418267
                30872608
                © The Author(s) 2019

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/501100007601, EC | Horizon 2020 (Horizon 2020 - Research and Innovation Framework Programme);
                Award ID: ITN IMPRESS no 642893
                Award ID: ITN IMPRESS no 642893
                Award ID: ITN IMPRESS no 642893
                Award ID: ITN IMPRESS no 642893
                Award ID: ITN IMPRESS no 642893
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/501100001665, Agence Nationale de la Recherche (French National Research Agency);
                Award ID: ANR-SALTEMP-12-ADAP-0021
                Award ID: ANR-SALTEMP-12-ADAP-0021
                Award ID: ANR-SALTEMP-12-ADAP-0021
                Award ID: ANR-SALTEMP-12-ADAP-0021
                Award ID: ANR-SALTEMP-12-ADAP-0021
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/501100005416, Norges Forskningsråd (Research Council of Norway);
                Award ID: DigiBrain no 248828
                Award Recipient :
                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2019

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article