7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Airborne fungi as indicators of ecosystem disturbance: an example from selected Tatra Mountains caves (Poland)

      , 1 , 2 , 2

      Aerobiologia

      Springer Netherlands

      Speleomycology, Aeromycology, Monitoring, Caves, Biodiversity

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          We report on the determination of the spore concentration and the species composition of the airborne fungi in selected caves of the Tatra Mountains, Poland. The following caves were surveyed: Mylna, Obłazkowa, Mroźna, Zimna and Naciekowa. The sampling was carried out in July 2015 and in January 2016. The aeromycological analyses were performed with the impact method, using the Air Ideal 3P apparatus and potato dextrose agar (PDA, Biocorp) culture medium. In the course of the July 2015 analysis, 17 species of fungi were isolated and 11 species were isolated in January 2016. In Mylna and Naciekowa caves, the dominant species were Cladosporium cladosporioides and Stachybotrys cylindrospora. In Obłazkowa cave, Rhizoctonia predominated and in Zimna cave—the colonies of the yeast-like fungi, along with S. cylindrospora. In Mroźna cave, Penicillium notatum was the most abundant taxon. In the winter time, in the majority of the caves Penicillium spp. predominated, with the exception of Mroźna and Naciekowa caves where Aspergillus niger was dominant. We propose that aeromycological monitoring be performed regularly in the following caves: Mroźna, Naciekowa and Zimna.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 24

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Geomycology: biogeochemical transformations of rocks, minerals, metals and radionuclides by fungi, bioweathering and bioremediation.

           Elaine M Gadd (2006)
          The study of the role that fungi have played and are playing in fundamental geological processes can be termed 'geomycology' and this article seeks to emphasize the fundamental importance of fungi in several key areas. These include organic and inorganic transformations and element cycling, rock and mineral transformations, bioweathering, mycogenic mineral formation, fungal-clay interactions, metal-fungal interactions, and the significance of such processes in the environment and their relevance to areas of environmental biotechnology such as bioremediation. Fungi are intimately involved in biogeochemical transformations at local and global scales, and although such transformations occur in both aquatic and terrestrial habitats, it is the latter environment where fungi probably have the greatest influence. Within terrestrial aerobic ecosystems, fungi may exert an especially profound influence on biogeochemical processes, particularly when considering soil, rock and mineral surfaces, and the plant root-soil interface. The geochemical transformations that take place can influence plant productivity and the mobility of toxic elements and substances, and are therefore of considerable socio-economic relevance, including human health. Of special significance are the mutualistic symbioses, lichens and mycorrhizas. Some of the fungal transformations discussed have beneficial applications in environmental biotechnology, e.g. in metal leaching, recovery and detoxification, and xenobiotic and organic pollutant degradation. They may also result in adverse effects when these processes are associated with the degradation of foodstuffs, natural products, and building materials, including wood, stone and concrete. It is clear that a multidisciplinary approach is essential to understand fully all the phenomena encompassed within geomycology, and it is hoped that this review will serve to catalyse further research, as well as stimulate interest in an area of mycology of global significance.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The need for management of nature conservation sites designated under Natura 2000

             OLE OSTERMANN (1998)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              A world review of fungi, yeasts, and slime molds in caves

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                wojciech.pusz@upwr.edu.pl
                Journal
                Aerobiologia (Bologna)
                Aerobiologia (Bologna)
                Aerobiologia
                Springer Netherlands (Dordrecht )
                0393-5965
                27 September 2017
                27 September 2017
                2018
                : 34
                : 1
                : 111-118
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Plant Protection, Wroclaw University and Environmental and Life Sciences, Grunwaldzki Sq. 24A, 50-363 Wrocław, Poland
                [2 ]Tatra National Park, Kuźnice 1, 34-500 Zakopane, Poland
                Article
                9498
                10.1007/s10453-017-9498-y
                5818591
                © The Author(s) 2017

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

                Categories
                Brief Communication
                Custom metadata
                © Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

                Ecology

                speleomycology, aeromycology, monitoring, caves, biodiversity

                Comments

                Comment on this article