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      Revision of the Afrotropical genus Pulchrisolia Szabó (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae, Sceliotrachelinae)

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      Journal of Hymenoptera Research

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          The genus Pulchrisolia Szabó is revised. Pulchrisolia maculata Szabó is redescribed and nine species are described as new: P. ankremos Lahey, sp. nov. (Ghana, Ivory Coast), P. asantesanavan Noort & Lahey, sp. nov. (South Africa), P. diehoekensis van Noort & Lahey, sp. nov. (South Africa), P. ellieae Lahey, sp. nov. (Madagascar), P. nephelae Lahey, sp. nov. (Benin, Burkina Faso, Gambia, Ivory Coast, Mali, Nigeria), P. robynae van Noort & Lahey, sp. nov. (South Africa), P. sanbornei Lahey & Masner, sp. nov. (South Africa), P. teras Lahey, sp. nov. (Madagascar), and P. valerieae Polaszek & Lahey, sp. nov. (Zambia). The genus is diagnosed from Afrisolia Masner & Huggert, Isolia Förster, and Sceliotrachelus Brues, and a key is provided to the platygastrid genera of the Isolia-cluster.

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          A Gross Anatomy Ontology for Hymenoptera

          Hymenoptera is an extraordinarily diverse lineage, both in terms of species numbers and morphotypes, that includes sawflies, bees, wasps, and ants. These organisms serve critical roles as herbivores, predators, parasitoids, and pollinators, with several species functioning as models for agricultural, behavioral, and genomic research. The collective anatomical knowledge of these insects, however, has been described or referred to by labels derived from numerous, partially overlapping lexicons. The resulting corpus of information—millions of statements about hymenopteran phenotypes—remains inaccessible due to language discrepancies. The Hymenoptera Anatomy Ontology (HAO) was developed to surmount this challenge and to aid future communication related to hymenopteran anatomy. The HAO was built using newly developed interfaces within mx, a Web-based, open source software package, that enables collaborators to simultaneously contribute to an ontology. Over twenty people contributed to the development of this ontology by adding terms, genus differentia, references, images, relationships, and annotations. The database interface returns an Open Biomedical Ontology (OBO) formatted version of the ontology and includes mechanisms for extracting candidate data and for publishing a searchable ontology to the Web. The application tools are subject-agnostic and may be used by others initiating and developing ontologies. The present core HAO data constitute 2,111 concepts, 6,977 terms (labels for concepts), 3,152 relations, 4,361 sensus (links between terms, concepts, and references) and over 6,000 text and graphical annotations. The HAO is rooted with the Common Anatomy Reference Ontology (CARO), in order to facilitate interoperability with and future alignment to other anatomy ontologies, and is available through the OBO Foundry ontology repository and BioPortal. The HAO provides a foundation through which connections between genomic, evolutionary developmental biology, phylogenetic, taxonomic, and morphological research can be actualized. Inherent mechanisms for feedback and content delivery demonstrate the effectiveness of remote, collaborative ontology development and facilitate future refinement of the HAO.
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            Antennal multiporous sensilla: their gustatory features for host recognition in female parasitic wasps (insecta, Hymenoptera: Platygastroidea).

            In parasitic wasps, various kinds of antennal plates have been interpreted as olfactory organs due to the presence of numerous pores. However, on the basis of ultrastructural investigations, some of these multiporous plates were revealed as being release sites of exocrine glands while others were postulated to have a gustatory function. Such sensilla, present only on female antennae, show unique features, found exclusively in Platygastroidea, with some differences between Scelionidae and Platygastridae. The cuticular apparatus consists of a short basiconic shaft with an apical multiporous area, the pores of which are covered by movable structures. The cellular components are made up of a remarkable number of sensory neurons, from 200 to 220, and an undefined number of sheath cells. These multiporous sensilla have tubular accessory glands that release their secretion through the socket sensillum only in scelionids. These morphological characters, combined with behavioral observations, strongly suggest a gustatory function, although electrophysiological studies are still needed to confirm this. A new terminology for antennal multiporous plates is discussed in relation to their different functions. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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              A Comparative Scanning Electron Microscopy Study on Antennal Sensilla ofTrissolcus japonicusandTrissolcus plautiae, Egg Parasitoids of Stink Bugs (Pentatomidae)

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Hymenoptera Research
                JHR
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2607
                1070-9428
                November 18 2019
                November 18 2019
                : 73
                : 39-71
                Article
                10.3897/jhr.73.33876
                © 2019

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