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      Perceptions of the educational environment among undergraduate physical therapy students in a competency-based curriculum at the University of Chile

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          Abstract

          Purpose

          This study aimed to assess the educational environment (EE) among students in a physical therapy undergraduate program, to identify patterns in EE perceptions among the students by year, and to determine issues that should be addressed.

          Methods

          The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) questionnaire was used to explore the relationships among the total mean score, subscales, and items in a competency-based curriculum in the physical therapy program at the University of Chile. The DREEM questionnaire was filled out by 166 of 244 students (68.03%), of whom 56.6% were men and 43.4% were women, with 75.9% between 19 and 23 years of age.

          Results

          The total mean score (120.9/200) indicated that the EE was perceived as ‘more positive than negative.’ There were significant differences (P<0.05) between first-year students (113.41), who reported the lowest total mean score, and fourth-year students (126.60), who had the highest total mean score. Students rated their EE favorably on each subscale except social self-perceptions, which second-year students rated as ‘not too bad,’ and for which first-, third-, and fourth-year students gave a rating corresponding to ‘not a nice place.’ On the perceptions of teachers subscale, there were significant differences (P<0.05) between first-year students (28.05/44) and fourth-year students (32.24/44) and between second-year students (28.72/44) and fourth-year students (32.24/44). On the academic self-perceptions subscale, there were significant differences (P<0.05) between first-year students (18.12/32) and second-year (21.68/32), third-year (22.33/32), and fourth-year students (21.87/32).

          Conclusion

          Physical therapy students at the University of Chile had positive perceptions of their EE. First-year students rated the largest number of items as problematic. Improvements are required across the program in the specific subscales mentioned above.

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          Most cited references 19

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          Measuring the educational environment in health professions studies: a systematic review.

          One of the determinants of the medical student's behaviour is the medical school learning environment. The aim of this research was to identify the instruments used to measure the educational environment in health professions education and to assess their validity and reliability. We performed an electronic search in the medical literature analysis and retrieval system online (MEDLINE) and Timelit (Topics in medical education) databases through to October 2008. The non-electronic search (hand searching) was conducted through reviewing the references of the retrieved studies and identifying the relevant ones. Two independent authors read, rated and selected studies for the review according to the pre-specified criteria. The inter-rater agreement was measured with Kappa coefficient. Seventy-nine studies were included with the Kappa coefficient of 0.79, which demonstrated a reliable process, and 31 instruments were extracted. The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure, Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure, Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision and Dental Student Learning Environment Survey are likely to be the most suitable instruments for undergraduate medicine, postgraduate medicine, nursing and dental education, respectively. As a valid and reliable instrument is available for each educational setting, a study to assess the educational environment should become a part of an institution's good educational practice. Further studies employing a wider range of databases with more elaborated search strategies will increase the comprehensiveness of the systematic review.
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            Development and validation of the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM)

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              The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM): a review of its adoption and use.

              The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) was published in 1997 as a tool to evaluate educational environments of medical schools and other health training settings and a recent review concluded that it was the most suitable such instrument. This study aimed to review the settings and purposes to which the DREEM has been applied and the approaches used to analyse and report it, with a view to guiding future users towards appropriate methodology. A systematic literature review was conducted using the Web of Knowledge databases of all articles reporting DREEM data between 1997 and 4 January 2011. The review found 40 publications, using data from 20 countries. DREEM is used in evaluation for diagnostic purposes, comparison between different groups and comparison with ideal/expected scores. A variety of non-parametric and parametric statistical methods have been applied, but their use is inconsistent. DREEM has been used internationally for different purposes and is regarded as a useful tool by users. However, reporting and analysis differs between publications. This lack of uniformity makes comparison between institutions difficult. Most users of DREEM are not statisticians and there is a need for informed guidelines on its reporting and statistical analysis.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                J Educ Eval Health Prof
                J Educ Eval Health Prof
                JEEHP
                Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions
                Korea Health Personnel Licensing Examination Institute
                1975-5937
                2019
                29 April 2019
                : 16
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile
                [2 ]Department of Health Sciences Education, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile
                [3 ]Laboratory for Scientific Image Analysis, Center for Medical Informatics and Telemedicine Program of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Biomedical Science Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile
                [4 ]School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile
                [5 ]Department of Theory and History of Education, Faculty of Philosophy and Educational Sciences, Basque Country University, UPV/EHU, Bilbao, Spain
                Hallym University, Korea
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding email: mantunez@ 123456med.uchile.cl
                Article
                jeehp-16-09
                10.3352/jeehp.2019.16.9
                6545526
                31064046
                © 2019, Korea Health Personnel Licensing Examination Institute

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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                Research Article

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