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      A pre–post intervention study of pulmonary rehabilitation for adults with post-tuberculosis lung disease in Uganda

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          Abstract

          Setting

          The study was conducted at Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda.

          Objective

          As chronic respiratory disease (CRD) is a huge, growing burden in Africa, with few available treatments, we aimed to design and evaluate a culturally appropriate pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) program in Uganda for people with post-tuberculosis lung disorder (p-TBLD).

          Design

          In a pre–post intervention study, a 6-week, twice-weekly PR program was designed for people with p-TBLD. Outcome measures included recruitment, retention, the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ), tests of exercise capacity, and biometrics. Given this was a developmental study, no formal statistical significance testing was undertaken.

          Results

          In all, 34 participants started PR and 29 (85%) completed all data collection. The mean age of the 29 participants was 45 years, and 52% were female. The mean (95% confidence interval) CCQ score at baseline was 1.8 (1.5, 2.0), at the end of PR was 1.0 (0.8, 1.2), and at 6 weeks after the end of PR was 0.8 (0.7, 1.0). The Incremental Shuttle Walking Test (ISWT) was 299 m (268.5, 329.4) at baseline, 377 (339.6, 413.8) at the end of PR, and 374 (334.2, 413.5) at 6 weeks after the end of PR. Improvements were seen in measures of chest pain; 13/29 (45%) participants reported chest pain at baseline but only 7/29 (24%) at the end of PR, and in those with persistent pain, the mean pain scores decreased. Mild hemoptysis was reported in 4/29 (17%) participants at baseline and in 2/29 (7%) at the end of PR.

          Conclusion

          PR for people with p-TBLD in Uganda was feasible and associated with clinically important improvements in quality of life, exercise capacity, and respiratory outcomes. PR uses local resources, requires little investment, and offers a new, sustainable therapy for p-TBLD in resource-limited settings. With the rising global burden of CRD, further studies are needed to assess the value of PR in p-TBLD and other prevalent forms of CRD.

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          Most cited references 24

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          American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement on pulmonary rehabilitation.

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            Pulmonary rehabilitation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

            Widespread application of pulmonary rehabilitation (also known as respiratory rehabilitation) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) should be preceded by demonstrable improvements in function (health-related quality of life, functional and maximal exercise capacity) attributable to the programmes. This review updates the review reported in 2006.
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              Development of a shuttle walking test of disability in patients with chronic airways obstruction.

              The aim was to develop a standardised and externally paced field walking test, incorporating an incremental and progressive structure, to assess functional capacity in patients with chronic airways obstruction. The usefulness of two different shuttle walking test protocols was examined in two separate groups of patients. The initial 10 level protocol (group A, n = 10) and a subsequent, modified, 12 level protocol (group B, n = 10) differed in the number of increments and in the speeds of walking. Patients performed three shuttle walking tests one week apart. Then the performance of patients (group C, n = 15) in the six minute walking test was compared with that in the second (modified) shuttle walking test protocol. Heart rate was recorded during all the exercise tests with a short range telemetry device. The 12 level modified protocol provided a measure of functional capacity in patients with a wide range of disability and was reproducible after just one practice walk; the mean difference between trial 2 v 3 was -2.0 (95% CI -21.9 to 17.9) m. There was a significant relation between the distance walked in the six minute walking test and the shuttle walking test (rho = 0.68) but the six minute walking test appeared to overestimate the extent of disability in some patients. The shuttle test provoked a graded cardiovascular response not evident in the six minute test. Moreover, the maximal heart rates attained were significantly higher for the shuttle walking test than for the six minute test. The shuttle walking test constitutes a standardised incremental field walking test that provokes a symptom limited maximal performance. It provides an objective measurement of disability and allows direct comparison of patients' performance.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                International Journal of COPD
                International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-9106
                1178-2005
                2017
                11 December 2017
                : 12
                : 3533-3539
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Population Studies and Clinical Trials, Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, Plymouth University, Plymouth, UK
                [2 ]Population Studies and Clinical Trials, Makerere Lung Institute, Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda
                [3 ]Cardio-Respiratory Directorate, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester
                [4 ]Population Studies and Clinical Trials, Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, Plymouth University, Plymouth, UK
                [5 ]Department of Physiotherapy, Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda
                [6 ]Medical Statistics, Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, Plymouth University, Plymouth, UK
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Rupert Jones, Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, Plymouth University, N14, ITTC Building, Plymouth PL6 8BX, UK, Tel +44 1752 76 4258, Email rupert.jones@ 123456plymouth.ac.uk
                Article
                copd-12-3533
                10.2147/COPD.S146659
                5729823
                © 2017 Jones et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Categories
                Original Research

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