33
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      3-D bioprinting technologies in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine: Current and future trends

      research-article

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Advances in three-dimensional (3D) printing have increased feasibility towards the synthesis of living tissues. Known as 3D bioprinting, this technology involves the precise layering of cells, biologic scaffolds, and growth factors with the goal of creating bioidentical tissue for a variety of uses. Early successes have demonstrated distinct advantages over conventional tissue engineering strategies. Not surprisingly, there are current challenges to address before 3D bioprinting becomes clinically relevant. Here we provide an overview of 3D bioprinting technology and discuss key advances, clinical applications, and current limitations. While 3D bioprinting is a relatively novel tissue engineering strategy, it holds great potential to play a key role in personalized medicine.

          Related collections

          Most cited references67

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Hydrogels in regenerative medicine.

          Hydrogels, due to their unique biocompatibility, flexible methods of synthesis, range of constituents, and desirable physical characteristics, have been the material of choice for many applications in regenerative medicine. They can serve as scaffolds that provide structural integrity to tissue constructs, control drug and protein delivery to tissues and cultures, and serve as adhesives or barriers between tissue and material surfaces. In this work, the properties of hydrogels that are important for tissue engineering applications and the inherent material design constraints and challenges are discussed. Recent research involving several different hydrogels polymerized from a variety of synthetic and natural monomers using typical and novel synthetic methods are highlighted. Finally, special attention is given to the microfabrication techniques that are currently resulting in important advances in the field.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues.

            Bioprinting is a 3D fabrication technology used to precisely dispense cell-laden biomaterials for the construction of complex 3D functional living tissues or artificial organs. While still in its early stages, bioprinting strategies have demonstrated their potential use in regenerative medicine to generate a variety of transplantable tissues, including skin, cartilage, and bone. However, current bioprinting approaches still have technical challenges in terms of high-resolution cell deposition, controlled cell distributions, vascularization, and innervation within complex 3D tissues. While no one-size-fits-all approach to bioprinting has emerged, it remains an on-demand, versatile fabrication technique that may address the growing organ shortage as well as provide a high-throughput method for cell patterning at the micrometer scale for broad biomedical engineering applications. In this review, we introduce the basic principles, materials, integration strategies and applications of bioprinting. We also discuss the recent developments, current challenges and future prospects of 3D bioprinting for engineering complex tissues. Combined with recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell technologies, 3D-bioprinted tissue models could serve as an enabling platform for high-throughput predictive drug screening and more effective regenerative therapies.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Designing cell-compatible hydrogels for biomedical applications.

              Hydrogels are polymeric materials distinguished by high water content and diverse physical properties. They can be engineered to resemble the extracellular environment of the body's tissues in ways that enable their use in medical implants, biosensors, and drug-delivery devices. Cell-compatible hydrogels are designed by using a strategy of coordinated control over physical properties and bioactivity to influence specific interactions with cellular systems, including spatial and temporal patterns of biochemical and biomechanical cues known to modulate cell behavior. Important new discoveries in stem cell research, cancer biology, and cellular morphogenesis have been realized with model hydrogel systems premised on these designs. Basic and clinical applications for hydrogels in cell therapy, tissue engineering, and biomedical research continue to drive design improvements using performance-based materials engineering paradigms.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                101635967
                42835
                Genes Dis
                Genes Dis
                Genes & diseases
                2352-3042
                27 November 2017
                22 November 2017
                December 2017
                15 June 2018
                : 4
                : 4
                : 185-195
                Affiliations
                [a ]Laboratory of Craniofacial Biology and Development, Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
                [b ]Molecular Oncology Laboratory, Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine, The University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
                [c ]The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
                [d ]Biomedical Engineering Department, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
                [e ]Department of Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL 60616, USA
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author. Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. Fax: +1 (773) 702 1634. rreid@ 123456surgery.bsd.uchicago.edu (R.R. Reid)
                Article
                NIHMS922847
                10.1016/j.gendis.2017.10.002
                6003668
                29911158
                16edcb29-3f0b-40c2-ba0f-6d8503038876

                This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

                History
                Categories
                Article

                additive manufacturing,bioprinting,cad/cam,3d printing,tissue engineering

                Comments

                Comment on this article