20
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Modelled drift patterns of fish larvae link coastal morphology to seabird colony distribution

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Colonial breeding is an evolutionary puzzle, as the benefits of breeding in high densities are still not fully explained. Although the dynamics of existing colonies are increasingly understood, few studies have addressed the initial formation of colonies, and empirical tests are rare. Using a high-resolution larval drift model, we here document that the distribution of seabird colonies along the Norwegian coast can be explained by variations in the availability and predictability of fish larvae. The modelled variability in concentration of fish larvae is, in turn, predicted by the topography of the continental shelf and coastline. The advection of fish larvae along the coast translates small-scale topographic characteristics into a macroecological pattern, viz. the spatial distribution of top-predator breeding sites. Our findings provide empirical corroboration of the hypothesis that seabird colonies are founded in locations that minimize travel distances between breeding and foraging locations, thereby enabling optimal foraging by central-place foragers.

          Abstract

          Seabirds breed in high density colonies, but the factors determining colony position aren't clear. Here, Sandvik et al. show that small-scale coastal topography is related to likely variation in fish larval abundance, which predicts the distribution of seabird colonies along the Norwegian coast.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 48

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The evolution of coloniality: the emergence of new perspectives.

          The evolution of group living remains an outstanding question in evolutionary ecology. Among the most striking forms of group living are the enormous assemblages of breeders that occur in many colonial marine birds and mammals, with some colonies containing more than a million individuals breeding in close contact. Coloniality is an evolutionary puzzle because individuals pay fitness costs to breed in high densities. Despite numerous potential benefits proposed to overcome these costs, we still lack a general framework to explain coloniality. Several new hypotheses involving breeding habitat and mate selection create promising approaches for studying this enigma.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Seabird colony distributions suggest competition for food supplies during the breeding season

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              The Adaptive Significance of Colonial Nesting in the Brewer's Blackbird (Euphagus Cyanocephalus)

               Henry Horn (1968)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nat Commun
                Nat Commun
                Nature Communications
                Nature Publishing Group
                2041-1723
                13 May 2016
                2016
                : 7
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Centre for Biodiversity Dynamics, Department of Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology , 7491 Trondheim, Norway
                [2 ]Department of Natural Sciences, Tromsø University Museum , PO Box 6050 Langnes, 9037 Tromsø, Norway
                [3 ]Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, FRAM—High North Research Centre for Climate and the Environment , 9296 Tromsø, Norway
                [4 ]Institute of Marine Research and Hjort Centre for Marine Ecosystem Dynamics , PO Box 1870 Nordnes, 5817 Bergen, Norway
                [5 ]Department of Arctic and Marine Biology, University of Tromsø , PO Box 6050 Langnes, 9037 Tromsø, Norway
                [6 ]Norwegian Institute for Nature Research , PO Box 5685 Sluppen, 7485 Trondheim, Norway
                Author notes
                Article
                ncomms11599
                10.1038/ncomms11599
                4869253
                27173005
                1703c1a6-a7b5-4ec2-89c7-64157bd4e74c
                Copyright © 2016, Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited. All Rights Reserved.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Categories
                Article

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article