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      Electrochemical Liquid Phase Epitaxy (ec-LPE): A New Methodology for the Synthesis of Crystalline Group IV Semiconductor Epifilms

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          Abstract

          Deposition of epitaxial germanium (Ge) thin films on silicon (Si) wafers has been achieved over large areas with aqueous feedstock solutions using electrochemical liquid phase epitaxy (ec-LPE) at low temperatures (T ≤ 90 °C). The ec-LPE method uniquely blends the simplicity and control of traditional electrodeposition with the material quality of melt growth. A new electrochemical cell design based on the compression of a liquid metal electrode into a thin cavity that enables ec-LPE is described. The epitaxial nature, low strain character, and crystallographic defect content of the resultant solid Ge films were analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction, scanning transmission electron microscopy, high resolution X-ray diffraction, and electron channeling contrast imaging. The results here show the first step toward a manufacturing infrastructure for traditional crystalline inorganic semiconductor epifilms that does not require high temperature, gaseous precursors, or complex apparatus.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Journal of the American Chemical Society
          J. Am. Chem. Soc.
          American Chemical Society (ACS)
          0002-7863
          1520-5126
          May 16 2017
          May 24 2017
          May 09 2017
          May 24 2017
          : 139
          : 20
          : 6960-6968
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Chemistry Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, United States
          [2 ]Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, United States
          [3 ]Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, United States
          Article
          10.1021/jacs.7b01968
          28485966
          © 2017
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