1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Loop Diuretics in the Treatment of Hypertension

      ,

      Current Hypertension Reports

      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 63

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Mechanism of impaired natriuretic response to furosemide during prolonged therapy.

          The mechanism of the diuretic braking phenomenon was studied in nine male hypertensive patients by assessing the diurnal pattern of renal sodium (Na) excretion during furosemide therapy, and the response to a test dose of furosemide (10 to 15 mg hr-1 i.v.) infused alone and with chlorothiazide (500 mg bolus i.v.). Patients were studied after one month of twice-daily administration of: placebo (P): chlorothiazide 500 mg (C); furosemide 40 mg (F); furosemide with spironolactone (100 mg b.i.d.) for the last 36 hours (F + S; N = 6). During F therapy, furosemide-induced natriuresis was followed by six hour periods of decreased UNaV. Diuretic therapy with F or C for one month reduced BP, but did not alter body weight, plasma volume (PV), glomerular filtration rate or PAH clearance. After P, the test infusion of furosemide increased fractional Na excretion (FENa) by +10.5 +/- 0.7%; this increment was reduced after therapy with F (+8.9 +/- 0.7%; P less than 0.05), C (+8.5 +/- 1.0%; P less than 0.01), or F + S (+8.9 +/- 0.9%; P less than 0.05). Renal furosemide excretion was greater (P less than 0.05) after F and C treatments (133 +/- 10 micrograms.min-1 and 130 +/- 13 micrograms.min-1, respectively) compared with P (94 +/- 9 micrograms.min-1). After P, a test dose of chlorothiazide given during furosemide infusion increased FENa further (+7.5 +/- 1.2%); this increment was greater after therapy with F (+10.1 +/- 1.4%; P less than 0.01) and F + S (+11.3 +/- 0.8%; P less than 0.05) but not after C (+6.3 +/- 1.5%; P greater than 0.1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Absence of cross-reactivity between sulfonamide antibiotics and sulfonamide nonantibiotics.

            The safety of sulfonamide nonantibiotics is unclear in patients with prior allergic reactions to sulfonamide antibiotics. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the General Practice Research Database in the United Kingdom, examining the risk of allergic reactions within 30 days after the receipt of a sulfonamide nonantibiotic. Patients with evidence of prior hypersensitivity after the receipt of a sulfonamide antibiotic were compared with those without such evidence. Similar analyses were also performed with the use of penicillins instead of sulfonamides, to determine whether any risk was specific to sulfonamide cross-reactivity. Of 969 patients with an allergic reaction after a sulfonamide antibiotic, 96 (9.9 percent) had an allergic reaction after subsequently receiving a sulfonamide nonantibiotic. Of 19,257 who had no allergic reaction after a sulfonamide antibiotic, 315 (1.6 percent) had an allergic reaction after receiving a sulfonamide nonantibiotic (adjusted odds ratio, 2.8; 95 percent confidence interval, 2.1 to 3.7). However, the risk of allergic reactions was even greater after the receipt of a penicillin among patients with a prior hypersensitivity reaction to a sulfonamide antibiotic, as compared with patients with no such history (adjusted odds ratio, 3.9; 95 percent confidence interval, 3.5 to 4.3). Furthermore, among those with a prior hypersensitivity reaction after the receipt of a sulfonamide antibiotic, the risk of an allergic reaction after the subsequent receipt of a sulfonamide nonantibiotic was lower than the risk of an allergic reaction after the subsequent receipt of a penicillin (adjusted odds ratio, 0.7; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.5 to 0.9). Finally, the risk of an allergic reaction after the receipt of a sulfonamide nonantibiotic was lower among patients with a history of hypersensitivity to sulfonamide antibiotics than among patients with a history of hypersensitivity to penicillins (adjusted odds ratio, 0.6; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.5 to 0.8). There is an association between hypersensitivity after the receipt of sulfonamide antibiotics and a subsequent allergic reaction after the receipt of a sulfonamide nonantibiotic, but this association appears to be due to a predisposition to allergic reactions rather than to cross-reactivity with sulfonamide-based drugs. Copyright 2003 Massachusetts Medical Society
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Use of diuretics in patients with hypertension.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Current Hypertension Reports
                Curr Hypertens Rep
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                1522-6417
                1534-3111
                April 2016
                March 7 2016
                April 2016
                : 18
                : 4
                Article
                10.1007/s11906-016-0636-7
                © 2016

                Comments

                Comment on this article