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      Four-Year Maintenance Treatment With Adalimumab in Patients with Moderately to Severely Active Ulcerative Colitis: Data from ULTRA 1, 2, and 3

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          Abstract

          OBJECTIVES:

          The safety and efficacy of adalimumab for patients with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis (UC) has been reported up to week 52 from the placebo-controlled trials ULTRA ( Ulcerative Colitis Long- Term Remission and Maintenance with Adalimumab) 1 and 2. Up to 4 years of data for adalimumab-treated patients from ULTRA 1, 2, and the open-label extension ULTRA 3 are presented.

          METHODS:

          Remission per partial Mayo score, remission per Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ) score, and mucosal healing rates were assessed in adalimumab-randomized patients from ULTRA 1 and 2 up to week 208. Corticosteroid-free remission was assessed in adalimumab-randomized patients who used corticosteroids at lead-in study baseline. Maintenance of remission per partial Mayo score and mucosal healing was assessed in patients who entered ULTRA 3 in remission per full Mayo score and with mucosal healing, respectively. As observed, last observation carried forward (LOCF) and nonresponder imputation (NRI) were used to report efficacy. Adverse events were reported for any adalimumab-treated patient.

          RESULTS:

          A total of 600/1,094 patients enrolled in ULTRA 1 or 2 were randomized to receive adalimumab and included in the intent-to-treat analyses of the studies. Of these, 199 patients remained on adalimumab after 4 years of follow-up. Rates of remission per partial Mayo score, remission per IBDQ score, mucosal healing, and corticosteroid discontinuation at week 208 were 24.7%, 26.3%, 27.7% (NRI), and 59.2% (observed), respectively. Of the patients who were followed up in ULTRA 3 (588/1,094), a total of 360 patients remained on adalimumab 3 years later. Remission per partial Mayo score and mucosal healing after ULTRA 1 or 2 to year 3 of ULTRA 3 were maintained by 63.6% and 59.9% of patients, respectively (NRI). Adverse event rates were stable over time.

          CONCLUSIONS:

          Remission, mucosal healing, and improved quality of life were maintained in patients with moderately to severely active UC with long-term adalimumab therapy, for up to 4 years. No new safety signals were reported.

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          Most cited references 14

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          Ulcerative colitis.

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            Adalimumab induces and maintains clinical remission in patients with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis.

            Adalimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Its efficacy as maintenance therapy for patients with ulcerative colitis has not been studied in a controlled, double-blind trial. Ulcerative colitis long-term remission and maintenance with adalimumab 2 (ULTRA 2) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of adalimumab in induction and maintenance of clinical remission in 494 patients with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis who received concurrent treatment with oral corticosteroids or immunosuppressants. Patients were stratified based on prior exposure to TNF-α antagonists (either had or had not been previously treated with anti-TNF-α) and randomly assigned to groups given adalimumab 160 mg at week 0, 80 mg at week 2, and then 40 mg every other week or placebo. Primary end points were remission at weeks 8 and 52. Overall rates of clinical remission at week 8 were 16.5% on adalimumab and 9.3% on placebo (P = .019); corresponding values for week 52 were 17.3% and 8.5% (P = .004). Among anti-TNF-α naïve patients, rates of remission at week 8 were 21.3% on adalimumab and 11% on placebo (P = .017); corresponding values for week 52 were 22% and 12.4% (P = .029). Among patients who had previously received anti-TNF agents, rates of remission at week 8 were 9.2% on adalimumab and 6.9% on placebo (P = .559); corresponding values for week 52 were 10.2% and 3% (P = .039). Serious adverse events occurred in 12% of patients given adalimumab or placebo. Serious infections developed in 1.6% of patients given adalimumab and 1.9% given placebo. In the group given adalimumab, 1 patient developed squamous cell carcinoma and 1 developed gastric cancer. Adalimumab was safe and more effective than placebo in inducing and maintaining clinical remission in patients with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis who did not have an adequate response to conventional therapy with steroids or immunosuppressants. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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              Lymphoproliferative disorders in patients receiving thiopurines for inflammatory bowel disease: a prospective observational cohort study.

              Reports of an increased risk of lymphoproliferative disorders in patients receiving thiopurines for inflammatory bowel disease are controversial. We assessed this risk in a prospective observational cohort study. 19,486 patients with inflammatory bowel disease, of whom 11,759 (60.3%) had Crohn's disease and 7727 (39.7%) had ulcerative colitis or unclassified inflammatory bowel disease, were enrolled in a nationwide French cohort by 680 gastroenterologists, who reported details of immunosuppressive therapy during the observation period, cases of cancer, and deaths. The risk of lymphoproliferative disorder was assessed according to thiopurine exposure. Median follow-up was 35 months (IQR 29-40). At baseline, 5867 (30.1%) of patients were receiving, 2809 (14.4%) had discontinued, and 10,810 (55.5%) had never received thiopurines. 23 new cases of lymphoproliferative disorder were diagnosed, consisting of one case of Hodgkin's lymphoma and 22 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoproliferative disorder. The incidence rates of lymphoproliferative disorder were 0.90 per 1000 (95% CI 0.50-1.49) patient-years in those receiving, 0.20/1000 (0.02-0.72) patient-years in those who had discontinued, and 0.26/1000 (0.10-0.57) patient-years in those who had never received thiopurines (p=0.0054). The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio of lymphoproliferative disorder between patients receiving thiopurines and those who had never received the drugs was 5.28 (2.01-13.9, p=0.0007). Most cases associated with thiopurine exposure matched the pathological range of post-transplant disease. Patients receiving thiopurines for inflammatory bowel disease have an increased risk of developing lymphoproliferative disorders. Programme Hospitalier de Recherche Clinique National (AOM05157), Association François Aupetit, Délégation Inter-régionale de la Recherche clinique Ile de France-Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Ligue contre le Cancer, and Fonds de Recherche de la Société Nationale Française de Gastro-entérologie.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Am J Gastroenterol
                Am. J. Gastroenterol
                The American Journal of Gastroenterology
                Nature Publishing Group
                0002-9270
                1572-0241
                November 2014
                26 August 2014
                : 109
                : 11
                : 1771-1780
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Gastroenterology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt Sinai , New York, New York, USA
                [2 ]Division of Gastroenterology, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center, University of California San Diego , La Jolla, California, USA
                [3 ]Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Calgary , Calgary, Alberta, Canada
                [4 ]Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates , Atlanta, Georgia, USA
                [5 ]Robarts Research Institute and University of Western Ontario , London, Ontario, Canada
                [6 ]Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, McMaster University , Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
                [7 ]AbbVie , North Chicago, Illinois, USA
                [8 ]AbbVie Deutschland , Ludwigshafen, Germany
                Author notes
                [* ]The Mount Sinai Medical Center, One Gustave L. Levy Place , Box 1069, New York, New York 10029, USA. E-mail: jean-frederic.colombel@ 123456mssm.edu
                Article
                ajg2014242
                10.1038/ajg.2014.242
                4223868
                25155227
                Copyright © 2014 American College of Gastroenterology

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/

                Categories
                Inflammatory Bowel Disease

                Gastroenterology & Hepatology

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