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      22q11.2 microdeletions: linking DNA structural variation to brain dysfunction and schizophrenia

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      Nature Reviews Neuroscience

      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

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          Abstract

          Recent studies are beginning to paint a clear and consistent picture of the impairments in psychological and cognitive competencies that are associated with microdeletions in chromosome 22q11.2. These studies have highlighted a strong link between this genetic lesion and schizophrenia. Parallel studies in humans and animal models are starting to uncover the complex genetic and neural substrates altered by the microdeletion. In addition to offering a deeper understanding of the effects of this genetic lesion, these findings may guide analysis of other copy-number variants associated with cognitive dysfunction and psychiatric disorders.

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          Most cited references153

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            Neuronal synchrony: a versatile code for the definition of relations?

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              A brain-specific microRNA regulates dendritic spine development.

              MicroRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs that control the translation of target messenger RNAs, thereby regulating critical aspects of plant and animal development. In the mammalian nervous system, the spatiotemporal control of mRNA translation has an important role in synaptic development and plasticity. Although a number of microRNAs have been isolated from the mammalian brain, neither the specific microRNAs that regulate synapse function nor their target mRNAs have been identified. Here we show that a brain-specific microRNA, miR-134, is localized to the synapto-dendritic compartment of rat hippocampal neurons and negatively regulates the size of dendritic spines--postsynaptic sites of excitatory synaptic transmission. This effect is mediated by miR-134 inhibition of the translation of an mRNA encoding a protein kinase, Limk1, that controls spine development. Exposure of neurons to extracellular stimuli such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor relieves miR-134 inhibition of Limk1 translation and in this way may contribute to synaptic development, maturation and/or plasticity.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Reviews Neuroscience
                Nat Rev Neurosci
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                1471-003X
                1471-0048
                June 2010
                June 2010
                : 11
                : 6
                : 402-416
                Article
                10.1038/nrn2841
                2977984
                20485365
                17d399ec-addb-4444-9423-483276003745
                © 2010

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