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The effect of copper on zinc in rat kidney and metallothionein in a dose-effect study

Trace Elements and Electrolytes

Dustri-Verlgag Dr. Karl Feistle

copper, zinc, metallothionein, rat, kidney

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      Abstract

      Abstract. The questions as to the increase in zinc (Zn) contents of kidney and metallothionein (MT) in response to copper (Cu) injection were examined. Each rat was injected intraperitoneally once with 0.9% NaCl or Cu (2, 4, or 6 mg Cu/kg body weight (BW)). After Cu injection, 60.0 – 63.3% of the renal Cu contents and 62.4 – 66.2% of the Zn contents were found in the cytosol. The Cu contents in the cytosol and kidneys increased following the injected amounts in the range of Cu dose of 0 and 4 mg kg BW, and remained unchanged thereafter. Although Zn contents in the cytosol and kidneys of the Cu-injected rats were higher than those of the control rats, they did not increase in response to Cu injection. The distribution profiles of the renal cytosol of Cu-injected rats on a Sephadex G-75 column showed that the amounts of the increased Cu and Zn were attributable to the MT fractions. The Cu concentrations in the MT fractions increased in response to Cu injection. It is interesting that in spite of no change in the Zn contents of the MT fractions with increasing doses of Cu, the Zn concentrations in the MT fractions of Cu-injected rats were higher than the control values. These results indicated that Cu injection could influence Zn contents in rat kidneys, the cytosol and the MT fractions in a dose-effect study.


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      Most cited references 16

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      Copper and carcinogenesis.

      Metal ions play an important role in biological systems, and without their catalytic presence in trace or ultratrace amounts many essential co-factors for many biochemical reactions would not take place. However, they become toxic to cells when their concentrations surpass certain optimal (natural) levels. Copper is an essential metal. Catalytic copper, because of its mobilization and redox activity, is believed to play a central role in the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as O2-* and *OH radicals, that bind very fast to DNA, and produce damage by breaking the DNA strands or modifying the bases and/or deoxyribose leading to carcinogenesis. The chemistry and biochemistry of copper is briefly accounted together with its involvement in cancer and other diseases.
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        Zinc homeostasis in humans.

        Maintaining a constant state of cellular zinc nutrition, or homeostasis, is essential for normal function. In animals and humans, adjustments in zinc absorption and endogenous intestinal excretion are the primary means of maintaining zinc homeostasis. The adjustments in gastrointestinal zinc absorption and endogenous excretion are synergistic. Shifts in endogenous excretion appear to occur quickly with changes in intake just above or below optimal intake. The absorption of zinc responds more slowly, but it has the capacity to cope with large fluctuations in intake. With extremely low zinc intakes or with prolonged marginal intakes, secondary homeostatic adjustments may augment the gastrointestinal changes. These secondary adjustments include changes in urinary zinc excretion, a shift in plasma zinc turnover rates and, possibly, an avid retention of zinc released from selected tissues, such as bone, in other tissues to maintain function.
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          Serum ceruloplasmin and copper levels in patients with primary brain tumors.

          Serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels are known to increase in several malignancies such as osteosarcomas, some gastrointestinal tumors, and lung cancer. In this study serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels in 40 patients with primary brain tumors were studied. Both parameters were increased in sera of patients with tumors in comparison with healthy subjects or patients with non-tumorous neurological diseases. It is concluded that copper and ceruloplasmin represent a good complement to some other nonspecific parameters in evaluating the activity of malignancy and the therapeutic results.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            Trace Elements and Electrolytes
            TE
            Dustri-Verlgag Dr. Karl Feistle
            0946-2104
            2017
            October 01 2017
            : 34
            : 10
            : 149-153
            10.5414/TEX01488
            © 2017
            ScienceOpen disciplines:
            Keywords:

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