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      Polysaccharide utilisation loci of Bacteroidetes from two contrasting open ocean sites in the North Atlantic.

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          Abstract

          Marine Bacteroidetes have pronounced capabilities of degrading high molecular weight organic matter such as proteins and polysaccharides. Previously we reported on 76 Bacteroidetes-affiliated fosmids from the North Atlantic Ocean's boreal polar and oligotrophic subtropical provinces. Here, we report on the analysis of further 174 fosmids from the same libraries. The combined, re-assembled dataset (226 contigs; 8.8 Mbp) suggests that planktonic Bacteroidetes at the oligotrophic southern station use more peptides and bacterial and animal polysaccharides, whereas Bacteroidetes at the polar station (East-Greenland Current) use more algal and plant polysaccharides. The latter agrees with higher abundances of algae and terrigenous organic matter, including plant material, at the polar station. Results were corroborated by in-depth bioinformatic analysis of 14 polysaccharide utilisation loci from both stations, suggesting laminarin-specificity for four and specificity for sulfated xylans for two loci. In addition, one locus from the polar station supported use of non-sulfated xylans and mannans, possibly of plant origin. While peptides likely represent a prime source of carbon for Bacteroidetes in open oceans, our data suggest that as yet unstudied clades of these Bacteroidetes have a surprisingly broad capacity for polysaccharide degradation. In particular, laminarin-specific PULs seem widespread and thus must be regarded as globally important.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Environ. Microbiol.
          Environmental microbiology
          Wiley
          1462-2920
          1462-2912
          December 2016
          : 18
          : 12
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Max-Planck-Institute for Marine Microbiology, Department of Molecular Ecology, Celsiusstraße 1, 28359, Bremen, Germany.
          [2 ] Leibniz Institute DSMZ-German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures, Inhoffenstraße 7B, 38124, Braunschweig, Germany.
          [3 ] Sorbonne Université, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 8227, Integrative Biology of Marine Models, Station Biologique de Roscoff, CS 90074, F-29688, Roscoff cedex, Bretagne, France.
          [4 ] University of Bayreuth, Biologie / Elektronenmikroskopie B1, Universitätsstraße 30, 95447, Bayreuth, Germany.
          [5 ] Laboratoire de Biologie Moléculaire pour l'Étude des Génomes, C.E.A, Institut de Génomique - Genoscope, 2 rue Gaston Crémieux, 91057, Évry cedex, France.
          Article
          10.1111/1462-2920.13429
          27348854

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