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Effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 and distal bowel resection on intestinal and systemic adaptive responses in rats

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      Abstract

      Objective

      To determine the effects of exogenous glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2), with or without massive distal bowel resection, on adaptation of jejunal mucosa, enteric neurons, gut hormones and tissue reserves in rats.

      Background

      GLP-2 is a gut hormone known to be trophic for small bowel mucosa, and to mimic intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome (SBS). However, the effects of exogenous GLP-2 and SBS on enteric neurons are unclear.

      Methods

      Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to four treatments: Transected Bowel (TB) (n = 8), TB + GLP-2 (2.5 nmol/kg/h, n = 8), SBS (n = 5), or SBS + GLP-2 (2.5 nmol/kg/h, n = 9). SBS groups underwent a 60% jejunoileal resection with cecectomy and jejunocolic anastomosis. All rats were maintained on parenteral nutrition for 7 d. Parameters measured included gut morphometry, qPCR for hexose transporter (SGLT-1, GLUT-2, GLUT-5) and GLP-2 receptor mRNA, whole mount immunohistochemistry for neurons (HuC/D, VIP, nNOS), plasma glucose, gut hormones, and body composition.

      Results

      Resection increased the proportion of nNOS immunopositive myenteric neurons, intestinal muscularis propria thickness and crypt cell proliferation, which were not recapitulated by GLP-2 therapy. Exogenous GLP-2 increased jejunal mucosal surface area without affecting enteric VIP or nNOS neuronal immunopositivity, attenuated resection-induced reductions in jejunal hexose transporter abundance (SGLT-1, GLUT-2), increased plasma amylin and decreased peptide YY concentrations. Exogenous GLP-2 attenuated resection-induced increases in blood glucose and body fat loss.

      Conclusions

      Exogenous GLP-2 stimulates jejunal adaptation independent of enteric neuronal VIP or nNOS changes, and has divergent effects on plasma amylin and peptide YY concentrations. The novel ability of exogenous GLP-2 to modulate resection-induced changes in peripheral glucose and lipid reserves may be important in understanding the whole-body response following intestinal resection, and is worthy of further study.

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      Most cited references 61

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      Analyzing real-time PCR data by the comparative C(T) method.

      Two different methods of presenting quantitative gene expression exist: absolute and relative quantification. Absolute quantification calculates the copy number of the gene usually by relating the PCR signal to a standard curve. Relative gene expression presents the data of the gene of interest relative to some calibrator or internal control gene. A widely used method to present relative gene expression is the comparative C(T) method also referred to as the 2 (-DeltaDeltaC(T)) method. This protocol provides an overview of the comparative C(T) method for quantitative gene expression studies. Also presented here are various examples to present quantitative gene expression data using this method.
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        Glucagon-like peptides GLP-1 and GLP-2, predicted products of the glucagon gene, are secreted separately from pig small intestine but not pancreas.

        We developed specific antibodies and RIAs for glucagon-like peptides 1 and 2 (GLP-1 and GLP-2), two predicted products of the glucagon gene, and studied the occurrence, nature, and secretion of immunoreactive GLP-1 and GLP-2 in pig pancreas and small intestine. Immunoreactive GLP-1 and GLP-2 were identified in glucagon-producing cells of the pancreatic islets, and in glicentin-producing cells of the small intestine. Immunoreactive GLP-1 and 2 in intestinal extracts corresponded in molecular size to peptides synthesized according to the predicted structure. By reverse phase HPLC, intestinal and synthetic GLP-1 behaved similarly, whereas synthetic and intestinal GLP-2 differed. Pancreatic extracts contained a large peptide with both GLP-1 and GLP-2 immunoreactivity. Secretion was studied using isolated perfused pig pancreas during arginine stimulation, and isolated perfused pig ileum during either luminal glucose stimulation or vascular administration of the neuropeptide, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP). Immunoreactive GLP-1 and GLP-2 were secreted in parallel with pancreatic glucagon and intestinal glicentin. The molecular forms of secreted immunoreactive GLP-1 and 2 corresponded to those identified in the tissue extracts.
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          Intestinal adaptation following resection.

          Intestinal adaptation is a natural compensatory process that occurs following extensive intestinal resection, whereby structural and functional changes in the intestine improve nutrient and fluid absorption in the remnant bowel. In animal studies, postresection structural adaptations include bowel lengthening and thickening and increases in villus height and crypt depth. Functional changes include increased nutrient transporter expression, accelerated crypt cell differentiation, and slowed transit time. In adult humans, data regarding adaptive changes are sparse, and the mechanisms underlying intestinal adaptation remain to be fully elucidated. Several factors influence the degree of intestinal adaptation that occurs post resection, including site and extent of resection, luminal stimulation with enteral nutrients, and intestinotrophic factors. Two intestinotrophic growth factors, the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide and recombinant growth hormone (somatropin), are now approved for clinical use in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Both agents enhance fluid absorption and decrease requirements for parenteral nutrition (PN) and/or intravenous fluid. Intestinal adaptation has been thought to be limited to the first 1-2 years following resection in humans. However, recent data suggest that a significant proportion of adult patients with SBS can achieve enteral autonomy, even after many years of PN dependence, particularly with trophic stimulation.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ] Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
            [2 ] Department of Biomedical Sciences, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, University of Copenhagen, The Panum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark
            [3 ] Department of Production Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
            [4 ] Department of Surgery, Sidra Medical and Research Center and Weil Cornell Medical College, Doha, Qatar
            University of Texas Medical Branch, UNITED STATES
            Author notes

            Competing Interests: DLS has acted as a speaker for Shire Pharmaceuticals on one occasion after this work was completed. This does not alter our adherence to PLOS ONE policies on sharing data and materials. The remaining authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

            Contributors
            ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4670-8795, Role: Conceptualization, Role: Data curation, Role: Formal analysis, Role: Funding acquisition, Role: Investigation, Role: Methodology, Role: Software, Role: Validation, Role: Visualization, Role: Writing – original draft, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Data curation, Role: Investigation, Role: Methodology, Role: Project administration, Role: Software, Role: Validation
            Role: Data curation, Role: Investigation, Role: Methodology, Role: Project administration
            Role: Data curation, Role: Formal analysis, Role: Investigation, Role: Methodology, Role: Validation, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Formal analysis, Role: Investigation, Role: Methodology, Role: Resources, Role: Validation, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Data curation, Role: Formal analysis, Role: Funding acquisition, Role: Investigation, Role: Methodology, Role: Supervision, Role: Writing – original draft, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Conceptualization, Role: Data curation, Role: Formal analysis, Role: Funding acquisition, Role: Investigation, Role: Methodology, Role: Project administration, Role: Resources, Role: Supervision, Role: Validation, Role: Writing – original draft, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Conceptualization, Role: Data curation, Role: Formal analysis, Role: Funding acquisition, Role: Investigation, Role: Methodology, Role: Project administration, Role: Resources, Role: Supervision, Role: Validation, Role: Visualization, Role: Writing – original draft, Role: Writing – review & editing
            Role: Editor
            Journal
            PLoS One
            PLoS ONE
            plos
            plosone
            PLoS ONE
            Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
            1932-6203
            24 July 2017
            2017
            : 12
            : 7
            28738080 5524396 10.1371/journal.pone.0181453 PONE-D-17-04560
            © 2017 Lai et al

            This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

            Counts
            Figures: 6, Tables: 3, Pages: 20
            Product
            Funding
            Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000038, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada;
            Award ID: 355993-2013
            Award Recipient :
            Funded by: Sidra Medical and Research Center
            Award Recipient :
            Funded by: funder-id http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100003206, Alberta Children's Hospital Foundation;
            Award ID: Professorship in Pediatric Surgerical Research
            Award Recipient :
            Salary support was provided by the University of Calgary Clinician Investigator Program and the Alberta Graduate Student Scholarship for SWL. Operational funding was provided by a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council Discovery Grant (Application ID 355993-2013, http://www.nserc-crsng.gc.ca/index_eng.asp) for PKC, and from the Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation Professorship in Pediatric Surgical Research and from Sidra Medical and Research Center, as part of the Qatar Foundation, to DLS. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
            Categories
            Research Article
            Medicine and Health Sciences
            Surgical and Invasive Medical Procedures
            Surgical Resection
            Medicine and Health Sciences
            Surgical and Invasive Medical Procedures
            Digestive System Procedures
            Intestinal Resection
            Medicine and Health Sciences
            Surgical and Invasive Medical Procedures
            Surgical Resection
            Intestinal Resection
            Biology and Life Sciences
            Cell Biology
            Cellular Types
            Animal Cells
            Neurons
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            Neuroscience
            Cellular Neuroscience
            Neurons
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            Body Fluids
            Blood
            Blood Plasma
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            Anatomy
            Body Fluids
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            Blood Plasma
            Biology and Life Sciences
            Physiology
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            Blood
            Blood Plasma
            Medicine and Health Sciences
            Physiology
            Body Fluids
            Blood
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            Biology and Life Sciences
            Anatomy
            Digestive System
            Gastrointestinal Tract
            Jejunum
            Medicine and Health Sciences
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            Digestive System
            Gastrointestinal Tract
            Jejunum
            Physical Sciences
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            Biology and Life Sciences
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            Medicine and Health Sciences
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            Custom metadata
            The raw data for these observations, and all the findings from this study, can be found at https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.4832648.v1.

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