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      New and emerging therapeutic agents for the treatment of fibromyalgia: an update

      Journal of pain research

      Dove Medical Press

      fibromyalgia, treatment, pharmacotherapy, pregabalin, duloxetine, milnacipran

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          Abstract

          Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic widespread pain condition that is estimated to affect 5 million US adults. Several molecular pathophysiologies are thought to contribute to the symptoms of FM, complicating the development of effective clinical management techniques. It is now known that abnormalities in both nociceptive and central pain processing systems are necessary (but perhaps not sufficient) to condition the onset and maintenance of FM, producing associated neuropsychologic symptoms such as pronounced fatigue, sleep abnormalities, cognitive difficulties, stress sensitivity, anxiety, and depression. Current treatment strategies are focused primarily on correcting the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying these nervous system abnormalities. Clinical studies demonstrate the safety and efficacy of three drugs recently approved for the treatment of FM: pregabalin (an alpha-2-delta ligand), and duloxetine and milnacipran (serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors). This review describes these pharmaceuticals in detail and discusses their current roles in FM management.

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          Most cited references 72

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          A common neurobiology for pain and pleasure.

          Pain and pleasure are powerful motivators of behaviour and have historically been considered opposites. Emerging evidence from the pain and reward research fields points to extensive similarities in the anatomical substrates of painful and pleasant sensations. Recent molecular-imaging and animal studies have demonstrated the important role of the opioid and dopamine systems in modulating both pain and pleasure. Understanding the mutually inhibitory effects that pain and reward processing have on each other, and the neural mechanisms that underpin such modulation, is important for alleviating unnecessary suffering and improving well-being.
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            Pharmacological profile of antidepressants and related compounds at human monoamine transporters.

            Using radioligand binding assays, we determined the equilibrium dissociation constants (KD's) for 37 antidepressants, three of their metabolites (desmethylcitalopram, desmethylsertraline, and norfluoxetine), some mood stabilizers, and assorted other compounds (some antiepileptics, Ca2+ channel antagonists, benzodiazepines, psychostimulants, antihistamines, and monoamines) for the human serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine transporters. Among the compounds that we tested, mazindol was the most potent at the human norepinephrine and dopamine transporters with KD's of 0.45 +/- 0.03 nM and 8.1 +/- 0.4 nM, respectively. Sertraline (KD = 25 +/- 2 nM) and nomifensine (56 +/- 3 nM) were the two most potent antidepressants at the human dopamine transporter. We showed significant correlations for antidepressant affinities at binding to serotonin (R = 0.93), norepinephrine (R = 0.97), and dopamine (R = 0.87) transporters in comparison to their respective values for inhibiting uptake of monoamines into rat brain synaptosomes. These data are useful in predicting some possible adverse effects and drug-drug interactions of antidepressants and related compounds.
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              EULAR evidence-based recommendations for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome.

              To develop evidence-based recommendations for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome. A multidisciplinary task force was formed representing 11 European countries. The design of the study, including search strategy, participants, interventions, outcome measures, data collection and analytical method, was defined at the outset. A systematic review was undertaken with the keywords "fibromyalgia", "treatment or management" and "trial". Studies were excluded if they did not utilise the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria, were not clinical trials, or included patients with chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis. Primary outcome measures were change in pain assessed by visual analogue scale and fibromyalgia impact questionnaire. The quality of the studies was categorised based on randomisation, blinding and allocation concealment. Only the highest quality studies were used to base recommendations on. When there was insufficient evidence from the literature, a Delphi process was used to provide basis for recommendation. 146 studies were eligible for the review. 39 pharmacological intervention studies and 59 non-pharmacological were included in the final recommendation summary tables once those of a lower quality or with insufficient data were separated. The categories of treatment identified were antidepressants, analgesics, and "other pharmacological" and exercise, cognitive behavioural therapy, education, dietary interventions and "other non-pharmacological". In many studies sample size was small and the quality of the study was insufficient for strong recommendations to be made. Nine recommendations for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome were developed using a systematic review and expert consensus.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Pain Res
                Journal of Pain Research
                Journal of pain research
                Dove Medical Press
                1178-7090
                2010
                22 July 2010
                : 3
                : 89-103
                Affiliations
                IGERT Program in Functional Genomics, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Maine and The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, Maine, USA
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Jill M Recla, 600 Main Street, Bar Harbor, Maine, ME 04609, USA, Tel +1 207 288 6408, Email jill.recla@ 123456jax.org
                Article
                jpr-3-089
                3004640
                21197313
                © 2010 Recla, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.

                This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited.

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