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      Relationship between afternoon napping and cognitive function in the ageing Chinese population

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          Abstract

          Background

          Several studies have shown that afternoon napping promotes cognitive function in the elderly; on the other hand, some studies have shown opposite results. This current study further examined the relationship between afternoon napping and cognitive function in the ageing Chinese population.

          Methods

          A total of 2214 elderly were included (napping group: n=1534; non-napping group: n=680). They all received cognitive evaluations by the Beijing version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, the Mini-Mental State Examination, and the Chinese version of the Neuropsychological Test Battery. Among all the subjects, 739 elderly volunteered to take blood lipid tests.

          Results

          Significant differences in cognitive function and blood lipids were observed between the napping and the non-napping groups. Afternoon napping was associated with better cognitive function including orientation, language, and memory in the present study. Subjects with the habit of afternoon napping also showed a higher level of triglyceride than the non-napping subjects.

          Conclusion

          The results demonstrated that afternoon napping was related to better cognitive function in the Chinese ageing population.

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          Most cited references31

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          The Montreal Cognitive Assessment, MoCA: a brief screening tool for mild cognitive impairment.

          To develop a 10-minute cognitive screening tool (Montreal Cognitive Assessment, MoCA) to assist first-line physicians in detection of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a clinical state that often progresses to dementia. Validation study. A community clinic and an academic center. Ninety-four patients meeting MCI clinical criteria supported by psychometric measures, 93 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) (Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score > or =17), and 90 healthy elderly controls (NC). The MoCA and MMSE were administered to all participants, and sensitivity and specificity of both measures were assessed for detection of MCI and mild AD. Using a cutoff score 26, the MMSE had a sensitivity of 18% to detect MCI, whereas the MoCA detected 90% of MCI subjects. In the mild AD group, the MMSE had a sensitivity of 78%, whereas the MoCA detected 100%. Specificity was excellent for both MMSE and MoCA (100% and 87%, respectively). MCI as an entity is evolving and somewhat controversial. The MoCA is a brief cognitive screening tool with high sensitivity and specificity for detecting MCI as currently conceptualized in patients performing in the normal range on the MMSE.
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            "Mini-mental state". A practical method for grading the cognitive state of patients for the clinician.

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              Dementia prevention, intervention, and care

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Gen Psychiatr
                Gen Psychiatr
                gpsych
                gpsych
                General Psychiatry
                BMJ Publishing Group (BMA House, Tavistock Square, London, WC1H 9JR )
                2517-729X
                2021
                25 January 2021
                : 34
                : 1
                : e100361
                Affiliations
                [1 ]departmentGeriatrics , The Fourth People's Hospital of Wuhu , Wuhu, Anhui, China
                [2 ]departmentAlzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Center , Shanghai Mental Health Center , Shanghai, China
                [3 ]departmentDepartment of Geriatric Psychiatry , Shanghai Mental Health Center , Shanghai, China
                [4 ]departmentSchool of Medicine , Shanghai Jiao Tong University , Shanghai, China
                Author notes
                [Correspondence to ] Dr Lin Sun; xiaosuan2004@ 123456126.com
                Author information
                http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5418-1201
                Article
                gpsych-2020-100361
                10.1136/gpsych-2020-100361
                7839842
                33585792
                193539aa-f162-434f-8978-b72c7d775e8d
                © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

                This is an open access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited, appropriate credit is given, any changes made indicated, and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

                History
                : 28 July 2020
                : 28 October 2020
                : 09 December 2020
                Funding
                Funded by: clinical research center project of Shanghai Mental Health Center;
                Award ID: CRC2017ZD02
                Funded by: Western medical guidance project of Shanghai Science and Technology Commission;
                Award ID: 17411970100
                Funded by: Precision medical research project of Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine;
                Award ID: 15ZH4010
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001809, National Natural Science Foundation of China;
                Award ID: 81301139
                Categories
                Original Research
                1506
                1612
                Custom metadata
                unlocked
                press-release
                press-release

                mental health,psychiatry,cognition disorders
                mental health, psychiatry, cognition disorders

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