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      3dLOGO: a web server for the identification, analysis and use of conserved protein substructures

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          Abstract

          3dLOGO is a web server for the identification and analysis of conserved protein 3D substructures. Given a set of residues in a PDB (Protein Data Bank) chain, the server detects the matching substructure(s) in a set of user-provided protein structures, generates a multiple structure alignment centered on the input substructures and highlights other residues whose structural conservation becomes evident after the defined superposition. Conserved residues are proposed to the user for highlighting functional areas, deriving refined structural motifs or building sequence patterns. Residue structural conservation can be visualized through an expressly designed Java application, 3dProLogo, which is a 3D implementation of a sequence logo. The 3dLOGO server, with related documentation, is available at http://3dlogo.uniroma2.it/

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          Most cited references 19

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          The P-loop--a common motif in ATP- and GTP-binding proteins.

          Many ATP- and GTP-binding proteins have a phosphate-binding loop (P-loop), the primary structure of which typically consists of a glycine-rich sequence followed by a conserved lysine and a serine or threonine. The three-dimensional structures of several ATP- and GTP-binding proteins containing P-loops have now been solved. In this review current knowledge of P-loops is discussed with the additional aim of illustrating the fascinating relationship between protein sequence, structure and function.
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            SuperPose: a simple server for sophisticated structural superposition.

            The SuperPose web server rapidly and robustly calculates both pairwise and multiple protein structure superpositions using a modified quaternion eigenvalue approach. SuperPose generates sequence alignments, structure alignments, PDB (Protein Data Bank) coordinates and RMSD statistics, as well as difference distance plots and images (both static and interactive) of the superimposed molecules. SuperPose employs a simple interface that requires only PDB files or accession numbers as input. All other superposition decisions are made by the program. SuperPose is uniquely able to superimpose structures that differ substantially in sequence, size or shape. It is also capable of handling a much larger range of superposition queries and situations than many standalone programs and yields results that are intuitively more in agreement with known biological or structural data. The SuperPose web server is freely accessible at http://wishart.biology.ualberta.ca/SuperPose/.
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              A method for simultaneous alignment of multiple protein structures.

              Here, we present MultiProt, a fully automated highly efficient technique to detect multiple structural alignments of protein structures. MultiProt finds the common geometrical cores between input molecules. To date, most methods for multiple alignment start from the pairwise alignment solutions. This may lead to a small overall alignment. In contrast, our method derives multiple alignments from simultaneous superpositions of input molecules. Further, our method does not require that all input molecules participate in the alignment. Actually, it efficiently detects high scoring partial multiple alignments for all possible number of molecules in the input. To demonstrate the power of MultiProt, we provide a number of case studies. First, we demonstrate known multiple alignments of protein structures to illustrate the performance of MultiProt. Next, we present various biological applications. These include: (1) a partial alignment of hinge-bent domains; (2) identification of functional groups of G-proteins; (3) analysis of binding sites; and (4) protein-protein interface alignment. Some applications preserve the sequence order of the residues in the alignment, whereas others are order-independent. It is their residue sequence order-independence that allows application of MultiProt to derive multiple alignments of binding sites and of protein-protein interfaces, making MultiProt an extremely useful structural tool. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nucleic Acids Res
                Nucleic Acids Res
                nar
                nar
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Oxford University Press
                0305-1048
                1362-4962
                July 2007
                8 May 2007
                8 May 2007
                : 35
                : Web Server issue
                : W416-W419
                Affiliations
                1Centre for Molecular Bioinformatics, Department of Biology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, 00133 Rome, Italy, 2Bioinformatics Group, I.R.B.M. P. Angeletti, MRL-Rome, Via Pontina Km, 30600 Pomezia, Italy, 3Center for Comparative Functional Genomics, Department of Biology, New York University, NY 10003, USA and 4Systems Biology Group - Max-Delbrück-Centrum für Molekulare Medizin, Berlin
                Author notes
                *To whom correspondence should be addressed. +39 067259 4324+39 067259 4314 allegra.via@ 123456uniroma2.it Correspondence may also be addressed to Manuela Helmer-Citterich. Email: citterich@ 123456uniroma2.it
                Article
                10.1093/nar/gkm228
                1933223
                17488847
                © 2007 The Author(s)

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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