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      A prospective, randomized trial of Unna's boots versus hydroactive dressing in the treatment of venous stasis ulcers.

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          Abstract

          In many centers the standard treatment for venous stasis ulcers consists of UB dressings. A new dressing, DuoDERM hydroactive dressing (HD), has recently been used extensively for the treatment of venous stasis ulcers. Because of this trend, a prospective, randomized trial of these two dressings was undertaken. Sixty-nine ulcers (39 HD and 30 UB) were randomized. End points were complete healing and development of complications necessitating cessation of treatment. Time to healing, cost of treatment, and patient convenience were also evaluated. Twenty-one of 30 ulcers (70%) healed with UB therapy compared with 15 of 39 ulcers (38%) treated with HD (p less than 0.01, CST). Life-table healing rates at 15 weeks were 64% for UB compared with 35% for HD (p = 0.01, log rank test). Ten of 39 patients (26%) receiving HD had complications compared with no complications in the UB group (p = 0.004, FET). For those patients whose ulcers healed, there was no significant difference (p = 0.51, STT) in the mean time required for healing or the average weekly cost of dressing materials between the HD group (7.0 weeks at +11.50 per week) and the UB group (8.4 weeks at +12.60 per week). Those patients treated with HD reported a significantly greater level of convenience than those patients with UB (p = 0.004, STT). Although treatment with HD led to better patient acceptance, those patients receiving UB therapy had a significantly greater rate of healing and a significantly lesser incidence of complications than those patients treated with HD.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J. Vasc. Surg.
          Journal of vascular surgery
          0741-5214
          0741-5214
          Mar 1988
          : 7
          : 3
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Surgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago.
          Article
          0741-5214(88)90466-1
          3279235

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