94
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares

      Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management (submit here)

      This international, peer-reviewed Open Access journal by Dove Medical Press focuses on reporting of clinical studies, outcomes and safety in all therapeutic areas and surgical interventions areas. Sign up for email alerts here.

      34,006 Monthly downloads/views I 2.755 Impact Factor I 4.5 CiteScore I 1.0 Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) I 0.598 Scimago Journal & Country Rank (SJR)

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Factors affecting therapeutic compliance: A review from the patient’s perspective

      research-article

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Objective

          To explore and evaluate the most common factors causing therapeutic non-compliance.

          Methods

          A qualitative review was undertaken by a literature search of the Medline database from 1970 to 2005 to identify studies evaluating the factors contributing to therapeutic non-compliance.

          Results

          A total of 102 articles was retrieved and used in the review from the 2095 articles identified by the literature review process. From the literature review, it would appear that the definition of therapeutic compliance is adequately resolved. The preliminary evaluation revealed a number of factors that contributed to therapeutic non-compliance. These factors could be categorized to patient-centered factors, therapy-related factors, social and economic factors, healthcare system factors, and disease factors. For some of these factors, the impact on compliance was not unequivocal, but for other factors, the impact was inconsistent and contradictory.

          Conclusion

          There are numerous studies on therapeutic noncompliance over the years. The factors related to compliance may be better categorized as “soft” and “hard” factors as the approach in countering their effects may differ. The review also highlights that the interaction of the various factors has not been studied systematically. Future studies need to address this interaction issue, as this may be crucial to reducing the level of non-compliance in general, and to enhancing the possibility of achieving the desired healthcare outcomes.

          Related collections

          Most cited references173

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Adherence to Medication

          New England Journal of Medicine, 353(5), 487-497
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Social support and patient adherence to medical treatment: a meta-analysis.

            In a review of the literature from 1948 to 2001, 122 studies were found that correlated structural or functional social support with patient adherence to medical regimens. Meta-analyses establish significant average r-effect sizes between adherence and practical, emotional, and unidimensional social support; family cohesiveness and conflict; marital status; and living arrangement of adults. Substantive and methodological variables moderate these effects. Practical support bears the highest correlation with adherence. Adherence is 1.74 times higher in patients from cohesive families and 1.53 times lower in patients from families in conflict. Marital status and living with another person (for adults) increase adherence modestly. A research agenda is recommended to further examine mediators of the relationship between social support and health.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Social Learning Theory and the Health Belief Model

              The Health Belief Model, social learning theory (recently relabelled social cognitive theory), self-efficacy, and locus of control have all been applied with varying success to problems of explaining, predicting, and influencing behavior. Yet, there is conceptual confusion among researchers and practitioners about the interrelationships of these theories and variables. This article attempts to show how these explanatory factors may be related, and in so doing, posits a revised explanatory model which incorporates self-efficacy into the Health Belief Model. Specifically, self-efficacy is proposed as a separate independent variable along with the traditional health belief variables of perceived susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers. Incentive to behave (health motivation) is also a component of the model. Locus of control is not included explicitly because it is believed to be incorporated within other elements of the model. It is predicted that the new formulation will more fully account for health-related behavior than did earlier formulations, and will suggest more effective behavioral interventions than have hitherto been available to health educators.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-6336
                1178-203X
                February 2008
                February 2008
                : 4
                : 1
                : 269-286
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Pharmacy, National University of Singapore Republic of Singapore
                [2 ]Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore Republic of Singapore
                [3 ]Discipline of Pharmacy and Experimental Pharmacology, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Newcastle Callaghan, Australia
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Shu Chuen Li Discipline of Pharmacy and Experimental Pharmacology, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia Tel +61 2 49215921 Email shuchuen.li@ 123456newcastle.edu.au
                Article
                10.2147/tcrm.s1458
                2503662
                18728716
                19919187-4a71-4b68-8707-741984afc19b
                © 2008 Dove Medical Press Limited. All rights reserved
                Categories
                Original Research

                Medicine
                adherence,factors,patient compliance
                Medicine
                adherence, factors, patient compliance

                Comments

                Comment on this article