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      The Hippo pathway polarizes the actin cytoskeleton during collective migration of Drosophila border cells

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          Abstract

          Localized Hippo signaling at contact sites between border cells induces polarized F-actin polymerization that drives collective cell migration.

          Abstract

          Collective migration of Drosophila border cells depends on a dynamic actin cytoskeleton that is highly polarized such that it concentrates around the outer rim of the migrating cluster of cells. How the actin cytoskeleton becomes polarized in these cells to enable collective movement remains unknown. Here we show that the Hippo signaling pathway links determinants of cell polarity to polarization of the actin cytoskeleton in border cells. Upstream Hippo pathway components localize to contacts between border cells inside the cluster and signal through the Hippo and Warts kinases to polarize actin and promote border cell migration. Phosphorylation of the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki)/YAP by Warts does not mediate the function of this pathway in promoting border cell migration, but rather provides negative feedback to limit the speed of migration. Instead, Warts phosphorylates and inhibits the actin regulator Ena to activate F-actin Capping protein activity on inner membranes and thereby restricts F-actin polymerization mainly to the outer rim of the migrating cluster.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J Cell Biol
          J. Cell Biol
          jcb
          The Journal of Cell Biology
          The Rockefeller University Press
          0021-9525
          1540-8140
          10 June 2013
          : 201
          : 6
          : 875-885
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Epithelial Biology Laboratory , and [2 ]Apoptosis and Cell Proliferation Laboratory, Cancer Research UK, London Research Institute, London WC2A 3LY, England, UK
          Author notes
          Correspondence to Barry J. Thompson: barry.thompson@ 123456cancer.org.uk

          E.P. Lucas and I. Khanal contributed equally to this paper.

          Article
          201210073
          10.1083/jcb.201210073
          3678158
          23733343
          © 2013 Lucas et al.

          This article is distributed under the terms of an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike–No Mirror Sites license for the first six months after the publication date (see http://www.rupress.org/terms). After six months it is available under a Creative Commons License (Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported license, as described at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/).

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          Cell biology

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