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      The 2016 World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System: a summary.

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          Abstract

          The 2016 World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System is both a conceptual and practical advance over its 2007 predecessor. For the first time, the WHO classification of CNS tumors uses molecular parameters in addition to histology to define many tumor entities, thus formulating a concept for how CNS tumor diagnoses should be structured in the molecular era. As such, the 2016 CNS WHO presents major restructuring of the diffuse gliomas, medulloblastomas and other embryonal tumors, and incorporates new entities that are defined by both histology and molecular features, including glioblastoma, IDH-wildtype and glioblastoma, IDH-mutant; diffuse midline glioma, H3 K27M-mutant; RELA fusion-positive ependymoma; medulloblastoma, WNT-activated and medulloblastoma, SHH-activated; and embryonal tumour with multilayered rosettes, C19MC-altered. The 2016 edition has added newly recognized neoplasms, and has deleted some entities, variants and patterns that no longer have diagnostic and/or biological relevance. Other notable changes include the addition of brain invasion as a criterion for atypical meningioma and the introduction of a soft tissue-type grading system for the now combined entity of solitary fibrous tumor / hemangiopericytoma-a departure from the manner by which other CNS tumors are graded. Overall, it is hoped that the 2016 CNS WHO will facilitate clinical, experimental and epidemiological studies that will lead to improvements in the lives of patients with brain tumors.

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          Most cited references39

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          Population-based studies on incidence, survival rates, and genetic alterations in astrocytic and oligodendroglial gliomas.

          Published data on prognostic and predictive factors in patients with gliomas are largely based on clinical trials and hospital-based studies. This review summarizes data on incidence rates, survival, and genetic alterations from population-based studies of astrocytic and oligodendrogliomas that were carried out in the Canton of Zurich, Switzerland (approximately 1.16 million inhabitants). A total of 987 cases were diagnosed between 1980 and 1994 and patients were followed up at least until 1999. While survival rates for pilocytic astrocytomas were excellent (96% at 10 years), the prognosis of diffusely infiltrating gliomas was poorer, with median survival times (MST) of 5.6 years for low-grade astrocytoma WHO grade II, 1.6 years for anaplastic astrocytoma grade III, and 0.4 years for glioblastoma. For oligodendrogliomas the MSTwas 11.6 years for grade II and 3.5 years for grade III. TP53 mutations were most frequent in gemistocytic astrocytomas (88%), followed by fibrillary astrocytomas (53%) and oligoastrocytomas (44%), but infrequent (13%) in oligodendrogliomas. LOH 1p/19q typically occurred in tumors without TP53 mutations and were most frequent in oligodendrogliomas (69%), followed by oligoastrocytomas (45%), but were rare in fibrillary astrocytomas (7%) and absent in gemistocytic astrocytomas. Glioblastomas were most frequent (3.55 cases per 100,000 persons per year) adjusted to the European Standard Population, amounting to 69% of total incident cases. Observed survival rates were 42.4% at 6 months, 17.7% at one year, and 3.3% at 2 years. For all age groups, survival was inversely correlated with age, ranging from an MST of 8.8 months ( 80 years). In glioblastomas, LOH 10q was the most frequent genetic alteration (69%), followed by EGFR amplification (34%), TP53 mutations (31%), p16INK4a deletion (31%), and PTEN mutations (24%). LOH 10q occurred in association with any of the other genetic alterations, and was the only alteration associated with shorter survival of glioblastoma patients. Primary (de novo) glioblastomas prevailed (95%), while secondary glioblastomas that progressed from low-grade or anaplastic gliomas were rare (5%). Secondary glioblastomas were characterized by frequent LOH 10q (63%) and TP53 mutations (65%). Of the TP53 mutations in secondary glioblastomas, 57% were in hot-spot codons 248 and 273, while in primary glioblastomas, mutations were more evenly distributed. G:C-->A:T mutations at CpG sites were more frequent in secondary than primary glioblastomas, suggesting that the acquisition of TP53 mutations in these glioblastoma subtypes may occur through different mechanisms.
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            C11orf95-RELA fusions drive oncogenic NF-κB signaling in ependymoma

            The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) family of transcriptional regulators are central mediators of the cellular inflammatory response. Although constitutive NF-κB signaling is present in most human tumours, mutations in pathway members are rare, complicating efforts to understand and block aberrant NF-κB activity in cancer. Here, we show that more than two thirds of supratentorial ependymomas contain oncogenic fusions between RELA, the principal effector of canonical NF-κB signalling, and an uncharacterized gene, C11orf95. In each case, C11orf95-RELA fusions resulted from chromothripsis involving chromosome 11q13.1. C11orf95-RELA fusion proteins translocated spontaneously to the nucleus to activate NF-κB target genes, and rapidly transformed neural stem cells—the cell of origin of ependymoma—to form these tumours in mice. Our data identify the first highly recurrent genetic alteration of RELA in human cancer, and the C11orf95-RELA fusion protein as a potential therapeutic target in supratentorial ependymoma.
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              Identification of recurrent NAB2-STAT6 gene fusions in solitary fibrous tumor by integrative sequencing.

              A 44-year old woman with recurrent solitary fibrous tumor (SFT)/hemangiopericytoma was enrolled in a clinical sequencing program including whole-exome and transcriptome sequencing. A gene fusion of the transcriptional repressor NAB2 with the transcriptional activator STAT6 was detected. Transcriptome sequencing of 27 additional SFTs identified the presence of a NAB2-STAT6 gene fusion in all tumors. Using RT-PCR and sequencing, we detected this fusion in all 51 SFTs, indicating high levels of recurrence. Expression of NAB2-STAT6 fusion proteins was confirmed in SFT, and the predicted fusion products harbor the early growth response (EGR)-binding domain of NAB2 fused to the activation domain of STAT6. Overexpression of the NAB2-STAT6 gene fusion induced proliferation in cultured cells and activated the expression of EGR-responsive genes. These studies establish NAB2-STAT6 as the defining driver mutation of SFT and provide an example of how neoplasia can be initiated by converting a transcriptional repressor of mitogenic pathways into a transcriptional activator.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Acta Neuropathol.
                Acta neuropathologica
                1432-0533
                0001-6322
                Jun 2016
                : 131
                : 6
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, WRN225, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA, 02114, USA. dlouis@mgh.harvard.edu.
                [2 ] Department of Pathology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
                [3 ] Department of Neuropathology, Heinrich Heine University, Duesseldorf, Germany.
                [4 ] German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Partner Site Essen/Duesseldorf, Germany.
                [5 ] Department of Neuropathology, Institute of Pathology, Ruprecht-Karls-University, Heidelberg, Germany.
                [6 ] Department of Pathology and Neuropathology, La Timone Hospital, Aix Marseille University, Marseille, France.
                [7 ] Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA.
                [8 ] International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France.
                [9 ] German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
                [10 ] Medical Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
                [11 ] Department of Pathology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA.
                Article
                10.1007/s00401-016-1545-1
                10.1007/s00401-016-1545-1
                27157931
                1a4e5c0e-b5eb-42bf-84cf-742ee48432dd
                History

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