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      New Coleoptera records from eastern Canada, with additions to the fauna of Manitoba, British Columbia, and Yukon Territory

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          Abstract

          One-hundred-eleven new provincial and territorial Coleoptera records are reported from New Brunswick (64), Nova Scotia (20), Prince Edward Island (5), Quebec (14), Manitoba (3), British Columbia (3), and Yukon Territory (2) for the 26 following families: Carabidae, Dytiscidae, Histeridae, Staphylinidae, Scarabaeidae, Buprestidae, Eucnemidae, Elateridae, Cantharidae, Erotylidae, Monotomidae, Cryptophagidae, Passandridae (first record of this family from New Brunswick), Laemophloeidae, Nitidulidae, Anamorphidae, Coccinellidae, Latridiidae, Mordellidae, Tenebrionidae, Cerambycidae, Chrysomelidae, Anthribidae, Brentidae, Dryophthoridae, and Curculionidae. Among these are ten new Canadian records: Heterosternuta oppositus (Say, 1823) (Dytiscidae) (New Brunswick), Gyrophaena blatchleyi Seevers, 1951 (Staphylinidae) (Quebec), Acropteroxys lecontei Crotch, 1873 (Erotylidae) (Manitoba), Placonotus falinorum Thomas, 2011 (Laemophloeidae) (Quebec), Adelina pallida (Say, 1824) (Tenebrionidae) (Quebec), Poecilocera harrisii (J.L. LeConte, 1851) (Chrysomelidae) (New Brunswick), Plesiobaris albilata (LeConte, 1876) (Curculionidae) (Quebec, New Brunswick), Pseudopityophthorus asperulus (LeConte, 1868) (Curculionidae) (Nova Scotia), Hylurgops palliatus (Gyllenhal, 1813) (Curculionidae) (New Brunswick), and Heteroborips seriatus (Blandford, 1894) (Curculionidae) (Nova Scotia). Plesiobaris disjuncta Casey reported as new for Canada in New Brunswick and Quebec by Webster et al. (2012a) is actually P. albilata (LeConte) and thus P. disjuncta is removed from the faunal list of Canada. Eleven species from New Brunswick not previously reported in literature were found on the online platforms BugGuide.Net and iNaturalist and are reported in this publication. This highlights the importance of online platforms dedicated to recording wildlife observations and citizen science in detecting new species records. Data is also presented for seven species from Quebec and two species from New Brunswick reported by Bousquet et al. (2013) without any supporting information for their occurrence in these provinces. Among the species reported here, 32 are adventive.

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          Most cited references 51

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          Emerald Ash Borer Invasion of North America: History, Biology, Ecology, Impacts, and Management

          Since its accidental introduction from Asia, emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), has killed millions of ash trees in North America. As it continues to spread, it could functionally extirpate ash with devastating economic and ecological impacts. Little was known about EAB when it was first discovered in North America in 2002, but substantial advances in understanding of EAB biology, ecology, and management have occurred since. Ash species indigenous to China are generally resistant to EAB and may eventually provide resistance genes for introgression into North American species. EAB is characterized by stratified dispersal resulting from natural and human-assisted spread, and substantial effort has been devoted to the development of survey methods. Early eradication efforts were abandoned largely because of the difficulty of detecting and delineating infestations. Current management is focused on biological control, insecticide protection of high-value trees, and integrated efforts to slow ash mortality.
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            Exotic bark- and wood-boring Coleoptera in the United States: recent establishments and interceptions

             Robert Haack (2006)
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              A MULTIPLE FUNNEL TRAP FOR SCOLYTID BEETLES (COLEOPTERA)

               B. Lindgren (1983)
              The multiple funnel trap, an efficient, collapsible, non-sticky trap for scolytid beetles, consists of a series of vertically aligned funnels with a collecting jar at the bottom. The trap compared favorably with sticky traps and Scandinavian drainpipe traps for three species of ambrosia beetles and the mountain pine beetle. Minimum maintenance required for this trap allows for high efficiency in pheromone-based research, survey, and mass trapping of scolytid beetles.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                ZooKeys
                ZK
                Pensoft Publishers
                1313-2970
                1313-2989
                July 06 2020
                July 06 2020
                : 946
                : 53-112
                Article
                10.3897/zookeys.946.52489
                © 2020

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