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      Stem Cell Therapy for Brain Tumors

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          ONCOLYTIC VIROTHERAPY

          Oncolytic virotherapy is an emerging treatment modality which uses replication competent viruses to destroy cancers. Advances in the past two years include preclinical proof of feasibility for a single-shot virotherapy cure, identification of drugs that accelerate intratumoral virus propagation, new strategies to maximize the immunotherapeutic potential of oncolytic virotherapy, and clinical confirmation of a critical viremic thereshold for vascular delivery and intratumoral virus replication. The primary clinical milestone was completion of accrual in a phase III trial of intratumoral herpes simplex virus therapy using talimogene laherparepvec for metastatic melanoma. Challenges for the field are to select ‘winners’ from a burgeoning number of oncolytic platforms and engineered derivatives, to transiently suppress but then unleash the power of the immune system to maximize both virus spread and anticancer immunity, to develop more meaningful preclinical virotherapy models and to manufacture viruses with orders of magnitude higher yields compared to established vaccine manufacturing processes.
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            Mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental tissues vs. those from other sources: their biology and role in regenerative medicine.

            To date, 5 different human dental stem/progenitor cells have been isolated and characterized: dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), and dental follicle progenitor cells (DFPCs). These postnatal populations have mesenchymal-stem-cell-like (MSC) qualities, including the capacity for self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potential. MSCs derived from bone marrow (BMMSCs) are capable of giving rise to various lineages of cells, such as osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic, myogenic, and neurogenic cells. The dental-tissue-derived stem cells are isolated from specialized tissue with potent capacities to differentiate into odontogenic cells. However, they also have the ability to give rise to other cell lineages similar to, but different in potency from, that of BMMSCs. This article will review the isolation and characterization of the properties of different dental MSC-like populations in comparison with those of other MSCs, such as BMMSCs. Important issues in stem cell biology, such as stem cell niche, homing, and immunoregulation, will also be discussed.
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              Concise review: isolation and characterization of cells from human term placenta: outcome of the first international Workshop on Placenta Derived Stem Cells.

              Placental tissue draws great interest as a source of cells for regenerative medicine because of the phenotypic plasticity of many of the cell types isolated from this tissue. Furthermore, placenta, which is involved in maintaining fetal tolerance, contains cells that display immunomodulatory properties. These two features could prove useful for future cell therapy-based clinical applications. Placental tissue is readily available and easily procured without invasive procedures, and its use does not elicit ethical debate. Numerous reports describing stem cells from different parts of the placenta, using nearly as numerous isolation and characterization procedures, have been published. Considering the complexity of the placenta, an urgent need exists to define, as clearly as possible, the region of origin and methods of isolation of cells derived from this tissue. On March 23-24, 2007, the first international Workshop on Placenta Derived Stem Cells was held in Brescia, Italy. Most of the research published in this area focuses on mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from various parts of the placenta or epithelial cells isolated from amniotic membrane. The aim of this review is to summarize and provide the state of the art of research in this field, addressing aspects such as cell isolation protocols and characteristics of these cells, as well as providing preliminary indications of the possibilities for use of these cells in future clinical applications.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                JTS
                International Journal of Translational Science
                IJTS
                River Publishers
                2246-8765
                2015
                : 2015
                : 1
                : 67-106
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Medicine � Division of Hematology/Oncology, New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, Newark, NJ 07103 USA
                Article
                10.13052/ijts2246-8765.20151005
                1a5d6dab-e375-4b16-87bc-e1bf9d94b231
                © 2015

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                History

                Engineering,Materials science
                Engineering, Materials science

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