Blog
About

16
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    4
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Anthropological Archaeology in 2015: Entanglements, Reflection, Reevaluation, and Archaeology beyond Disciplinary Boundaries : Anthropological Archaeology in 2015

      1

      American Anthropologist

      Wiley

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 123

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Book: not found

          The operated Markov´s chains in economy (discrete chains of Markov with the income)

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Book: not found

            How Forests Think

             Eduardo Kohn (2013)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              The domestication of Amazonia before European conquest.

              During the twentieth century, Amazonia was widely regarded as relatively pristine nature, little impacted by human history. This view remains popular despite mounting evidence of substantial human influence over millennial scales across the region. Here, we review the evidence of an anthropogenic Amazonia in response to claims of sparse populations across broad portions of the region. Amazonia was a major centre of crop domestication, with at least 83 native species containing populations domesticated to some degree. Plant domestication occurs in domesticated landscapes, including highly modified Amazonian dark earths (ADEs) associated with large settled populations and that may cover greater than 0.1% of the region. Populations and food production expanded rapidly within land management systems in the mid-Holocene, and complex societies expanded in resource-rich areas creating domesticated landscapes with profound impacts on local and regional ecology. ADE food production projections support estimates of at least eight million people in 1492. By this time, highly diverse regional systems had developed across Amazonia where subsistence resources were created with plant and landscape domestication, including earthworks. This review argues that the Amazonian anthrome was no less socio-culturally diverse or populous than other tropical forested areas of the world prior to European conquest.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                American Anthropologist
                American Anthropologist
                Wiley
                00027294
                June 2016
                June 2016
                April 27 2016
                : 118
                : 2
                : 301-316
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Philosophy; Northern Kentucky University; Highland Heights KY 41099
                Article
                10.1111/aman.12531
                © 2016

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/aman.12531

                Comments

                Comment on this article