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      Hyperglycemia in Children Hospitalized with Acute Asthma.

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          Abstract

          Hyperglycemia is frequently observed in adults with acute asthma. We aimed to assess the frequency of hyperglycemia and its relation to outcomes in children admitted with acute asthma. In this retrospective study, we reviewed medical records of non-diabetic 166 children (66 girls) with the mean age of 5.4 ± 2.6 years (range of 2-12 years), who were hospitalized with acute asthma between January 2012 through December 2014. Data pertaining to demographics, vital signs, oxygen saturation, serum blood glucose level, electrolytes, blood gases, and admission were collected. Children with other chronic conditions were excluded. The findings were that hyperglycemia (blood glucose ≥ 11.1 mmol/l) was observed in 38.6% of children. The median baseline blood glucose (IQR) was 9.8 mmol/l (7.2-13.3 mmol/l). Blood glucose level was associated with the length of hospitalization, with a median extension of 1.8 days, but was inversely associated with the serum potassium and bicarbonate levels. There were no associations between baseline blood glucose and age, gender, baseline respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, or intensive care admission. Hyperglycemia resolved spontaneously in all affected children. We conclude that hyperglycemia is common in children hospitalized with acute asthma. Hyperglycemia could be considered as a marker of a longer hospital stay.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Adv. Exp. Med. Biol.
          Advances in experimental medicine and biology
          Springer Science and Business Media LLC
          0065-2598
          0065-2598
          February 21 2018
          : 1070
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
          [2 ] Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
          [3 ] Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. aangari@ksu.edu.sa.
          Article
          10.1007/5584_2018_152
          29460272

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