12
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      What people with aphasia want: Their goals according to the ICF

      , , , , , ,

      Aphasiology

      Informa UK Limited

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 25

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          ICF linking rules: an update based on lessons learned.

          Outcome research seeks to understand the end results of health services. Researchers use a wide variety of outcome measures including technical, clinical and patient-oriented measures. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a common reference framework for functioning may contribute to improved outcome research. The objective of this paper is to provide an updated version of the linking rules published in 2002 and illustrate how these rules are applied to link technical and clinical measures, health-status measures and interventions to the ICF. Three specific linking rules have been established to link health-status measures to the ICF and one specific linking rule has been created to link technical and clinical measures and interventions. A total of 8 linking rules have been established for use with all different outcome measures and with interventions. The newly updated linking rules will allow researchers systematically to link and compare meaningful concepts contained in them. This should prove extremely useful in selecting the most appropriate outcome measures among a number of candidate measures for the applied interventions. Further possible applications are the operationalization of concrete ICF categories using specific measures or the creation of ICF category-based item bankings.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Goal attainment scaling (GAS) in rehabilitation: a practical guide.

            Goal attainment scaling is a mathematical technique for quantifying the achievement (or otherwise) of goals set, and it can be used in rehabilitation. Because several different approaches are described in the literature, this article presents a simple practical approach to encourage uniformity in its application. It outlines the process of setting goals appropriately, so that the achievement of each goal can be measured on a 5-point scale ranging from -2 to +2, and then explains a method for quantifying the outcome in a single aggregated goal attainment score. This method gives a numerical T-score which is normally distributed about a mean of 50 (if the goals are achieved precisely) with a standard deviation of around this mean of 10 (if the goals are overachieved or underachieved). If desired, the approach encompasses weighting of goals to reflect the opinion of the patient on the personal importance of the goal and the opinion of the therapist or team on the difficulty of achieving the goal. Some practical tips are offered, as well as a simple spreadsheet (in Microsoft Excel) allowing easy calculation of the T-scores.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Linking health-status measurements to the international classification of functioning, disability and health.

              With the approval of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health by the World Health Assembly in May 2001, the concurrent use of both health-status measures and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health is expected. It is therefore important to understand the relationship between these two concepts. The objective of this paper is to provide a systematic and standardized approach when linking health-status measures to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The specific aims are to develop rules, to test their reliability and to illustrate these rules with examples. Ten linking rules and an example of their use are presented in this paper. The percentage agreement between two health professionals for 8 health-status instruments tested is also presented. A high level of agreement between the health professionals reflects that the linking rules established in this study allow the sound linking of items from health-status measures to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Aphasiology
                Aphasiology
                Informa UK Limited
                0268-7038
                1464-5041
                February 03 2011
                February 03 2011
                : 25
                : 3
                : 309-322
                Article
                10.1080/02687038.2010.508530
                © 2011

                Comments

                Comment on this article