6
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      The apoptotic effects of Brucea javanica fruit extract against HT29 cells associated with p53 upregulation and inhibition of NF-κB translocation

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          Brucea javanica (L.) Merr. is a plant from the genus Brucea, which is used in local traditional medicine to treat various diseases. Recent studies revealed an impressive anticancer efficiency of B. javanica extract in different types of cancer cells.

          Purpose

          In this study, we have investigated the cytotoxic effects of the B. javanica hexane, ethanolic extracts against colon cancer cells. HT29 colon cells were selected as an in vitro cancer model to evaluate the anticancer activity of B. javanica ethanolic extract (BJEE) and the possible mechanisms of action that induced apoptosis.

          Methods

          3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5,-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), lactate dehydrogenase, acridine orange/propidium iodide, and annexin-V-fluorescein isothiocyanate assays were performed to determine the antiproliferative and apoptosis validation of BJEE on cancer cells. Measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, caspase activities, nucleus factor-κB activity, and gene expression experiments was done to investigate the potential mechanisms of action in the apoptotic process.

          Results

          The results obtained from this study illustrated the significant antiproliferative effect of BJEE on colorectal cancer cells, with a concentration value that inhibits 50% of the cell growth of 25±3.1 µg/mL after 72 h of treatment. MTT assay demonstrated that the BJEE is selectively toxic to cancer cells, and BJEE induced cell apoptosis via activation of caspase-8 along with modulation of apoptosis-related proteins such as Fas, CD40, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligands, and tumor necrosis factor receptors, which confirmed the contribution of extrinsic pathway. Meanwhile, increased ROS production in treated cells subsequently activated caspase-9 production, which triggered the intrinsic pathways. In addition, overexpression of cytochrome-c, Bax, and Bad proteins along with suppression of Bcl-2 illustrated that mitochondrial-dependent pathway also contributed to BJEE-induced cell death. Consistent with the findings from this study, BJEE-induced cancer cell death proceeds via extrinsic and intrinsic mitochondrial-dependent and -independent events.

          Conclusion

          From the evidence obtained from this study, it is concluded that the BJEE is a promising natural extract to combat colorectal cancer cells (HT29 cells) via induction of apoptosis through activation of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 39

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Extrinsic versus intrinsic apoptosis pathways in anticancer chemotherapy.

           S Fulda,  K-M Debatin (2006)
          Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a key regulator of physiological growth control and regulation of tissue homeostasis. One of the most important advances in cancer research in recent years is the recognition that cell death mostly by apoptosis is crucially involved in the regulation of tumor formation and also critically determines treatment response. Killing of tumor cells by most anticancer strategies currently used in clinical oncology, for example, chemotherapy, gamma-irradiation, suicide gene therapy or immunotherapy, has been linked to activation of apoptosis signal transduction pathways in cancer cells such as the intrinsic and/or extrinsic pathway. Thus, failure to undergo apoptosis may result in treatment resistance. Understanding the molecular events that regulate apoptosis in response to anticancer chemotherapy, and how cancer cells evade apoptotic death, provides novel opportunities for a more rational approach to develop molecular-targeted therapies for combating cancer.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Drug discovery from medicinal plants.

            Current research in drug discovery from medicinal plants involves a multifaceted approach combining botanical, phytochemical, biological, and molecular techniques. Medicinal plant drug discovery continues to provide new and important leads against various pharmacological targets including cancer, HIV/AIDS, Alzheimer's, malaria, and pain. Several natural product drugs of plant origin have either recently been introduced to the United States market, including arteether, galantamine, nitisinone, and tiotropium, or are currently involved in late-phase clinical trials. As part of our National Cooperative Drug Discovery Group (NCDDG) research project, numerous compounds from tropical rainforest plant species with potential anticancer activity have been identified. Our group has also isolated several compounds, mainly from edible plant species or plants used as dietary supplements, that may act as chemopreventive agents. Although drug discovery from medicinal plants continues to provide an important source of new drug leads, numerous challenges are encountered including the procurement of plant materials, the selection and implementation of appropriate high-throughput screening bioassays, and the scale-up of active compounds.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Apoptosis, autophagy, necroptosis, and cancer metastasis

              Metastasis is a crucial hallmark of cancer progression, which involves numerous factors including the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM), the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tumor angiogenesis, the development of an inflammatory tumor microenvironment, and defects in programmed cell death. Programmed cell death, such as apoptosis, autophagy, and necroptosis, plays crucial roles in metastatic processes. Malignant tumor cells must overcome these various forms of cell death to metastasize. This review summarizes the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms by which key regulators of apoptosis, autophagy, and necroptosis participate in cancer metastasis and discusses the crosstalk between apoptosis, autophagy, and necroptosis involved in the regulation of cancer metastasis.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2018
                29 March 2018
                : 12
                : 657-671
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
                [2 ]Institute of Biological Science, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
                [3 ]Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Elham Bagheri, Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Tel +60 17 335 1816, Fax +60 37 967 4902, Email eli_bagheri85@ 123456yahoo.com
                Nur’Ain Salehen, Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Email nurain_36@ 123456um.edu.my
                Article
                dddt-12-657
                10.2147/DDDT.S155115
                5881282
                © 2018 Bagheri et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Comments

                Comment on this article